Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

MAKING DEAD MEN SPEAK: LAUDIANISM, PRINT, AND THE WORKS OF LANCELOT ANDREWES, 1626–1642

  • PETER McCULLOUGH (a1)

Abstract

This study examines the posthumous competition over the print publication of works by Lancelot Andrewes (1555–1626) before the English Civil War. The print history of the two official volumes edited by Laud and John Buckeridge (1626), and of competing editions of texts rejected by them but printed by puritan publishers, sheds important new light not only on the formation of the Andrewes canon, but on Laud's manipulation of the print trade and his attempts to erect new textual authorities to support his vision of the church in Britain.

Copyright

Footnotes

Hide All
This article grew out of a paper read to the third Reading Literature and History Conference, ‘Texts and Cultural Change’, July 1995. In expanded form it was presented to the Religious History Seminar at the Institute for Historical Research, and to the Tudor–Stuart History Seminar at Cambridge University. I am particularly grateful for the questions and comments of Drs Nicholas Tyacke, Kenneth Fincham, and John Morrill, and to the early encouragement of Professor Peter Lake and Dr David Armitage.

Footnotes

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

MAKING DEAD MEN SPEAK: LAUDIANISM, PRINT, AND THE WORKS OF LANCELOT ANDREWES, 1626–1642

  • PETER McCULLOUGH (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.