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EUV ablation of organic polymers at a high fluence

  • Chiara Liberatore (a1) (a2), Klaus Mann (a3), Matthias Müller (a3), Ladislav Pina (a2), Libor Juha (a1), Jorge J. Rocca (a4), Akira Endo (a1) and Tomas Mocek (a1)...

Abstract

A preliminary investigation on short-wavelength ablation mechanisms of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly (1,4-phenylene ether ether-sulfone) (PPEES) by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation at 13.5 nm using a table-top laser-produced plasma from a gas-puff target at LLG (Göttingen) and at 46.9 nm by a 10 Hz desktop capillary discharge laser operated at the Institute of Physics (Prague) is presented. Ablation of polymer materials is initiated by photo-induced polymer chain scissions. The ablation occurs due to the formation of volatile products by the EUV radiolysis removed as an ablation plume from the irradiated material into the vacuum. In general, cross-linking of polymer molecules can compete with the chain decomposition. Both processes may influence the efficiency and quality of micro(nano)structuring in polymer materials. Wavelength is a critical parameter to be taken into account when an EUV ablation process occurs, because different wavelengths result in different energy densities in the near-surface region of the polymer exposed to nanosecond pulses of intense EUV radiation.

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Copyright

The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution licence .

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: C. Liberatore, HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Za Radnicí 825, 25241 Dolní Břežany, Czech Republic. Email: liberatore@fzu.cz

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