Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Kalyani cohort – the first platform in Eastern India for longitudinal studies on health and disease parameters in peri-urban setting

  • S. Chatterjee (a1) and P. P. Majumder (a2)

Abstract

The Kalyani cohort created in 2010 by the National Institute of Biomedical Genomics, West Bengal, India, is designed to serve as a platform for conducting prospective basic and translational studies on epidemiology and genomics of health and disease-related parameters, particularly of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The overall goal is to assess behavioural, biological, genetic, social and environmental factors and obtain necessary evidence for effective health improvement. Collected baseline data comprise 15727 individuals, >14 years of age from seven municipal wards in the Kalyani and Gayeshpur regions. Data are being collected on demographics, current health status, medical history and health-related behaviours. Blood samples were also collected from a subset of individuals (n = 5132) and analysed for estimation of known markers of NCDs. DNA has been extracted from blood samples and stored for future use. Important baseline findings include a high prevalence of diabetes, dyslipidemias and hypothyroidism. Prevalence estimates for these disorders obtained from self-reported data are significantly lower, indicating that participants are unaware of their health problems. The identification of ‘at risk’ individuals will allow formation of sub-cohorts for further investigations of epidemiological and genetic risk factors for NCDs. Access to the resource, including data and blood samples, created by this study will be provided to other researchers.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Kalyani cohort – the first platform in Eastern India for longitudinal studies on health and disease parameters in peri-urban setting
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Kalyani cohort – the first platform in Eastern India for longitudinal studies on health and disease parameters in peri-urban setting
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Kalyani cohort – the first platform in Eastern India for longitudinal studies on health and disease parameters in peri-urban setting
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: P. P. Majumder, National Institute of Biomedical Genomics, Netaji Subhas Sanatorium (2nd Floor), Kalyani 741251, India. (Email: ppm1@nibmg.ac.in)

References

Hide All
1. Alwan, A, et al. Monitoring and surveillance of chronic non-communicable diseases: progress and capacity in high-burden countries. Lancet 2010; 376: 18611868.
2.World Health Organization: Global status report on non-communicable diseases 2010. (http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2011/9789240686458_eng.pdf?ua=1). Accessed 10 June 2015.
3. Reddy, KS, et al. Responding to the threat of chronic diseases in India. Lancet 2005; 366: 17441749.
4. Mohan, V, et al. Epidemiology of diabetes: Indian scenario. Indian Journal of Medical Research 2007; 125: 217230.
5. Reddy, KS. Cardiovascular diseases in India. World Health Statistics Quarterly 1993; 46: 101.
6. India: Cardiovascular diseases and its risk profile. (http://www.ccdcindia.org/pdfs/CVD_profile_corrected.pdf). Accessed 2 December 2015.
7. Reddy, KS, et al. Coronary Heart Disease risk factors in an industrial population of North India. Canadian Journal of Cardiology 1997; 13 (Suppl. B): 0002.
8. Siegel, KR, et al. Non-communicable diseases in South Asia: contemporary perspectives. British Medical Bulletin 2014; 111: 3144.
9. Joshua, P, et al. Association analysis in African Americans of European-derived type 2 diabetes single nucleotide polymorphisms from whole-genome association studies. Diabetes 2008; 57: 22202225.
10. Cities having population 1 lakh and above. Census of India, Government of India. (http://censusindia.gov.in/2011-prov-results/paper2/data_files/India2/Table_2_PR_Cities_1Lakh_and_Above.pdf). Accessed 15 August 2015.
11. Gayeshpur municipality. (http://www.gayeshpurmunicipality.org/). Accessed 11 June 2015.
12. Census of India 2001. (http://censusindia.gov.in/2011-common/censusdataonline.html). Accessed 15 August 2015.
13. Chellan, R. Prevalence of Iron-Deficiency Anaemia in India: Results from a Large Nationwide Survey. (Ramesh%20Chellan_JPSS.pdf). Accessed 20 December 2015.
14. Arnold, F, et al. Nutrition in India in National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3) India 2005–06, 2009, (http://www.rchiips.org/nfhs/nutrition_report_for_website_18sep09.pdf). Accessed 15 August 2015.
15.World Health Organization definition and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and intermediate hyperglycemia: Report of a WHO/IDF Consultation, Geneva, World Health Organization, 2006. (https://www.idf.org/webdata/docs/WHO_IDF_definition_diagnosis_of_diabetes.pdf). Accessed 15 August 2015.
16. Anjana, RM, et al. Prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) in urban and rural India: phase I results of the Indian Council of Medical Research-INdia DIABetes (ICMR-INDIAB) study. Diabetologia 2011; 54: 30223027.
17. Executive summary of the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). Expert panel on detection, evaluation and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults (adult treatment panel III). JAMA 2001; 285: 24862497.
18. Joshi, SR, et al. Prevalence of dyslipidemia in urban and rural India: the ICMR-INDIAB study. PLoS ONE 2014; 9: e96808.
19. Unnikrishnan, AG, et al. Prevalence of hypothyroidism in adults: an epidemiological study in eight cities of India. Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2013; 17: 647652.
20. Bergmann, MM, et al. Validity of self-reported diagnoses leading to hospitalization: a comparison of self-reports with hospital records in a prospective study of American adults. American Journal of Epidemiology 1998; 147: 969977.
21. Okura, Y, et al. Agreement between self-report questionnaires and medical record data was substantial for diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke but not for heart failure. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 2004; 57: 10961103.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed