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H3Africa multi-centre study of the prevalence and environmental and genetic determinants of type 2 diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa: study protocol

  • K. Ekoru (a1) (a2), E. H. Young (a1) (a2), C. Adebamowo (a3) (a4), N. Balde (a5), B. J. Hennig (a6) (a7), P. Kaleebu (a8), S. Kapiga (a9) (a10), N. S. Levitt (a11), M. Mayige (a12), J. C. Mbanya (a13), M. I. McCarthy (a14) (a15) (a16), O. Nyan (a17), M. Nyirenda (a18), J. Oli (a10), K. Ramaiya (a19), L. Smeeth (a20), E. Sobngwi (a13), C. N. Rotimi (a21), M. S. Sandhu (a1) (a2) and A. A. Motala (a22)...

Summary

The burden and aetiology of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its microvascular complications may be influenced by varying behavioural and lifestyle environments as well as by genetic susceptibility. These aspects of the epidemiology of T2D have not been reliably clarified in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), highlighting the need for context-specific epidemiological studies with the statistical resolution to inform potential preventative and therapeutic strategies. Therefore, as part of the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) initiative, we designed a multi-site study comprising case collections and population-based surveys at 11 sites in eight countries across SSA. The goal is to recruit up to 6000 T2D participants and 6000 control participants. We will collect questionnaire data, biophysical measurements and biological samples for chronic disease traits, risk factors and genetic data on all study participants. Through integrating epidemiological and genomic techniques, the study provides a framework for assessing the burden, spectrum and environmental and genetic risk factors for T2D and its complications across SSA. With established mechanisms for fieldwork, data and sample collection and management, data-sharing and consent for re-approaching participants, the study will be a resource for future research studies, including longitudinal studies, prospective case ascertainment of incident disease and interventional studies.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: Prof A.A. Motala, Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag 7, Congella, 4013, South Africa. (Email: motala@ukzn.ac.za)
Dr M. Sandhu, Department of Medicine, International Health Research Group, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. (Email: ms23@sanger.ac.uk)
Prof C. Rotimi, Center for Research on Genomics and Global Health, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. (Email: rotimic@mail.nih.gov)

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H3Africa multi-centre study of the prevalence and environmental and genetic determinants of type 2 diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa: study protocol

  • K. Ekoru (a1) (a2), E. H. Young (a1) (a2), C. Adebamowo (a3) (a4), N. Balde (a5), B. J. Hennig (a6) (a7), P. Kaleebu (a8), S. Kapiga (a9) (a10), N. S. Levitt (a11), M. Mayige (a12), J. C. Mbanya (a13), M. I. McCarthy (a14) (a15) (a16), O. Nyan (a17), M. Nyirenda (a18), J. Oli (a10), K. Ramaiya (a19), L. Smeeth (a20), E. Sobngwi (a13), C. N. Rotimi (a21), M. S. Sandhu (a1) (a2) and A. A. Motala (a22)...

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