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The Hill–Robertson effect is a consequence of interplay between linkage, selection and drift: a commentary on ‘The effect of linkage on limits to artificial selection’ by W. G. Hill and A. Robertson

  • ZHAO-BANG ZENG (a1)
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      The Hill–Robertson effect is a consequence of interplay between linkage, selection and drift: a commentary on ‘The effect of linkage on limits to artificial selection’ by W. G. Hill and A. Robertson
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      The Hill–Robertson effect is a consequence of interplay between linkage, selection and drift: a commentary on ‘The effect of linkage on limits to artificial selection’ by W. G. Hill and A. Robertson
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The Hill–Robertson effect is a consequence of interplay between linkage, selection and drift: a commentary on ‘The effect of linkage on limits to artificial selection’ by W. G. Hill and A. Robertson

  • ZHAO-BANG ZENG (a1)

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