Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Information:

  • Access
  • Cited by 7

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Evolutionary flux of P element regulation in a Drosophila melanogaster hybrid dysgenesis cline
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Evolutionary flux of P element regulation in a Drosophila melanogaster hybrid dysgenesis cline
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Evolutionary flux of P element regulation in a Drosophila melanogaster hybrid dysgenesis cline
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Abstract

Clines of P-induced hybrid dysgenesis provide a means for monitoring the evolution of transposition repression over space and time. We have studied the molecular and phenotypic profiles of flies taken from a 2900 km cline along the eastern coast of Australia, which had previously been characterized over 10 years ago as having P populations in the north, Q populations at central sites and M′ populations in the south. We have found that Q and M′ populations of flies have increased their range within the cline at the expense of P lines. Q populations were found to be in the north of the cline and M′ populations in the south. Some of the northern Q lines transmit repression through both sexes and type I deletion elements have been isolated from them. We suggest that these elements are responsible for Q type repression. The results support our model that populations made up of Q individuals with strong biparentally transmitted repression form an evolutionarily stable strategy for the repression of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.