Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Information:

  • Access
  • Cited by 7

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Estimation of additive and dominance variance components in finite polygenic models and complex pedigrees
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Estimation of additive and dominance variance components in finite polygenic models and complex pedigrees
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Estimation of additive and dominance variance components in finite polygenic models and complex pedigrees
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Abstract

Estimation of variance components with the finite polygenic model (FPM) was evaluated. Phenotypic data for a 6300-pedigree simulated under a wide range of additive genetic models were analysed with constant homozygote difference across loci using deterministic Maximum Likelihood (DML) and a Bayesian method implemented via Gibbs sampling (BGS). Results indicate that under no selection, both DML and BGS accurately estimated the variance components, with a FPM of 5 loci or more. When both analysis methods were applied to equivalent data sets on populations that had undergone selection, the DML method produced upward biased estimates of additive genetic variation and heritability due to its use of pedigree loop cutting, while BGS provided more accurate estimation. BGS was extended to non-additive FPMs with variable homozygote differences and dominance effect across loci. This method was used to analyse data simulated under two genetic models with positive, completely dominant gene action at all loci. Results indicate that the estimates of additive and dominance variances slowly increase as the number of loci in the FPM for analysis increases, while accuracy of predicting individual breeding values and dominance deviations remains unaffected. For the simulated pedigree structure, a FPM with 10 loci or slightly fewer appears to be appropriate for variance component estimation in the presence of dominance.