Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Characterization and differential expression of a human gene family of olfactomedin-related proteins

  • NALINI H. KULKARNI (a1), CHRISTA A. KARAVANICH (a1), WILLIAM R. ATCHLEY (a2) and ROBERT R. H. ANHOLT (a1) (a2)

Abstract

Olfactomedin-related proteins are secreted glycoproteins with conserved C-terminal motifs. Olfactomedin was originally identified as the major component of the mucus layer that surrounds the chemosensory dendrites of olfactory neurons. Homologues were subsequently found also in other tissues, including the brain and in species ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to Homo sapiens. Most importantly, the TIGR/myocilin protein, expressed in the eye and associated with the pathogenesis of glaucoma, is an olfactomedin-related protein. The prevalence of olfactomedin-related proteins among species and their identification in different tissues prompted us to investigate whether a gene family exists within a species, specifically Homo sapiens. A GenBank search indeed revealed an entire human gene family of olfactomedin-related proteins with at least five members, designated hOlfA through hOlfD and the TIGR/myocilin protein. hOlfA corresponds to the rat neuronal AMZ protein. Phylogenetic analyses of 18 olfactomedin-related sequences resolved four distinct subfamilies. Among the human proteins, hOlfA and hOlfC, both expressed in brain, are most closely related. Northern blot analyses of 16 human tissues demonstrated highly specific expression patterns: hOlfA is expressed in brain, hOlfB in pancreas and prostate, hOlfC in cerebellum, hOlfD in colon, small intestine and prostate and TIGR/myocilin in heart and skeletal muscle. The link between TIGR/myocilin and ocular hypertension and the expression of several of these proteins in mucus-lined tissues suggest that they play an important role in regulating physical properties of the extracellular environment. Future studies can now assess whether other members of this gene family, like TIGR/myocilin, are also associated with human disease processes.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Characterization and differential expression of a human gene family of olfactomedin-related proteins
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Characterization and differential expression of a human gene family of olfactomedin-related proteins
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Characterization and differential expression of a human gene family of olfactomedin-related proteins
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Corresponding author. Department of Zoology, Box 7617, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695–7617, USA. Tel: +1 (919) 515 1173. Fax: +1 (919) 515 3355. e-mail: anholt@ncsu.edu

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed