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The political economy of agricultural protection: Sweden 1887

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 December 2010

SIBYLLE LEHMANN
Affiliation:
University of Cologne, Sibylle.Lehmann@wiso.uni-koeln.de
OLIVER VOLCKART
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science, O.J.Volckart@lse.ac.uk
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Abstract

We analyse the Swedish general elections that took place in spring and autumn 1887. Our aim is to discover which groups of voters supported free trade and which protectionism. We find that while capital owners and wage earners consistently favoured free trade, in the spring election only the largest farmers supported protectionism. By autumn, political preferences among smallholders and middling farmers had shifted in favour of protectionism too. As these groups were not specialised in the production of import-competing goods, we assume that the political landslide in the autumn elections can be attributed to a loss of trust in the government.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © European Historical Economics Society 2010

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