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Satisfaction with body image, attitudes and habits relating to nutrition in secondary school students

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

M. Burgic-Radmanovic
Affiliation:
Psychiatric Clinic, Clinical Centre, Bosnia-Herzegovina
S. Burgic
Affiliation:
Medical Faculty, University Banja Luka, Banja Luka, Bosnia-Herzegovina

Abstract

Introduction

In the adolescence, girls are often preoccupied with body image, express discontent with their figure, body weight and want to lose weight.

Objective

Our objective was to inquire eating attitudes and habits among female adolescents.

Method

Survey research carried out among female adolescents, age of 16 – 17, in four secondary schools in Banja Luka (economic, medical, agricultural and grammar school). Survey questionnaire EAT-26, modified by author, was used. The response rate was 1301 (90.3%) out of 1441 (total number of pupils in first and second grade of schools).

Results

In inquired secondary schools 90 girls (6.9%) out of 1301 have body mass index < 18,5 kg/m2. About 26.9% of all respondents, want to be thinner, while 37.3% never want to be thinner, with statically significant difference (df = 834; T = 7.94; p < 0.01).

With 46.25% of all respondents with BMI < 18.5 kg/m2 and 43.6% female students with an optimal BMI said they never eat dietary food with statistically significant difference (V = 73, T = 2.05, < 0.05) compared to girls with a BMI > 25 kg/m2. Diet foods are not eaten ever 48.6% of respondents with a statistically significant difference compared to those who do it sometimes (20.5%)

Discussion

Unrealistic perception of “body-image” may bring different health-damaging risks. They varied from inadequate dieting attempts to inability of recognizing and preventing overweight.

Conclusion

In order to that previously acquired knowledge and positive attitudes about nutrition necessary to introduce this subject within the school curriculum.

Type
P01-268
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2011
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