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Plasma soluble interleukin-2-receptor in depression: relationships to plasma neopterin and serum IL-2 concentrations and HPA-axis activity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

M Maes
Affiliation:
University Department of Psychiatry, AZ Stuivenberg, 267 Lange Beeldekensstraat, 2060Antwerp, Belgium Departments of Psychiatry, University Hospitals of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium Cleveland, Ohio, USA
E Bosmans
Affiliation:
Eurogenetics, Tessenderlo, Belgium
S Scharpé
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Biochemistry, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium
P D'Hondt
Affiliation:
Departments of Psychiatry, University Hospitals of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium
R Desnyder
Affiliation:
University Department of Psychiatry, AZ Stuivenberg, 267 Lange Beeldekensstraat, 2060Antwerp, Belgium

Summary

The present study examined the plasma concentration of the soluble interleukin-2-receptor (sIL-2R) in depressed subjects in relation to hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis function and plasma neopterin and serum IL-2 concentrations. Plasma sIL-2R concentration was significantly higher in depressed patients (n = 47) than in controls (n = 19). There were no significant correlations between plasma sIL-2R and severity of illness. In the depressed subjects, there was a highly significant relationship between plasma sIL-2R and neopterin concentrations. Depressed patients with pathologically increased plasma neopterin levels had significantly higher plasma sIL-2R values than those with normal serum neopterin. There were no significant relationships between plasma sIL-2R and indices of HPA-axis function in depression. There was no significant effect of dexamethasone administration on sIL-2R levels. Significantly more depressed subjects had measurable serum IL-2 levels than normal controls. Our data support the notion that a moderate activation of cell-mediated immunity may play a role in the pathophysiology of depression.

Type
Original article
Copyright
Copyright © Elsevier, Paris 1995

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