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Interoceptive Exposure at the Heart of Emotional Identification work in Psychotherapy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

A. Suchocka Capuano
Affiliation:
Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal de Villeneuve Saint-Georges, Consultations de PsychiatrieVilleneuve Saint-Georges CedexFrance
A. Karar
Affiliation:
Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal de Villeneuve Saint-Georges, Consultations de PsychiatrieVilleneuve Saint-Georges CedexFrance
A. Georgin
Affiliation:
Université Paris 8, Psychology, Vincennes, Saint-Denis, France
R. Allek
Affiliation:
Université Paris 8, Psychology, Vincennes, Saint-Denis, France
C. Dupuy
Affiliation:
Université Paris 8, Psychology, Vincennes, Saint-Denis, France
S. Bouyakoub
Affiliation:
Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal de Villeneuve Saint-Georges, Consultations de PsychiatrieVilleneuve Saint-Georges CedexFrance

Abstract

Introduction

Emotional avoidance is a target process, offered by modern psychotherapies. Emotional exposure is often difficult to put in place when there is a major cognitive and behavioral avoidance. Education on emotional processes is necessary but often insufficient during individual follow-up.

Objectives

The longitudinal study seeks to verify whether work on exposure and emotional identification influences the decreased level of anxiety and depression.

Aims

Introduction of interoceptive exposition in psychotherapy decreases the frequency of emotional avoidance.

Method

Group psychotherapy composed of two modules: interoceptive exposure and emotional identification was proposed to patients with anxiety and depressive disorders. A group of 6 participants was evaluated at three times: T0 before the start of the group, T1 post-module 1 and T2 post-group. Assessments of HAMA anxiety, MADRS depression, QEC cognitive avoidance, UPPS impulsivity, MCQ-30 metacognition and emotional regulation REQ-21 have been proposed.

Results

Significant differences were observed between pre- and post-intervention scores (Friedman test). The HAMA anxiety rate (P = 0.006) and the MADRS depression (P = 0.047) decreased. Participants in the group were less likely to use QEC thought substitution (P = 0.009) and urgency in their UPPS reactions (P = 0.03). Moreover, their external dysfunction REQ. 21 decreases (P = 0.03).

Conclusion

Faced with emotional avoidance, work on emotional identification requires prior interoceptive exposure. It is a first stage of work that involves sensitizing to the presence of emotional bodily sensations. Group work facilitates exposure to emotion and its identification; decentration leading to emotional intensity decrease. The work on the interoceptive exhibition facilitates the emotional exposure while participating in the deactivation of the associative emotional network.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

Type
e-Poster Viewing: Psychotherapy
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2017
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