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P0043 - Variations in alcohol-metabolizing enzymes in people of East Indian and African descent from Trinidad and Tobago

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

L.K. Montane Jaime
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of The West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
S.M. Moore
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, The University of The West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
L.G. Carr
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA
C.L. Ehlers
Affiliation:
Department of Molecular and Integrative Neuroscience and The Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, Scripps Research Institute, la Jolla, CA, USA
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Abstract

Background and Aim:

Differences in alcoholism rates exist between Indo- and Afro-Trinidadians. We investigated whether these differences are explained by variations in the genes encoding the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase.

Methods:

ADH1B, ADH1C, ALDH1 and ALDH2 polymorphisms were determined as well as serum alanine aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase levels.

Results:

Forty-four percent of Indo-Trinidadians had one ADH1C∗2 and one ADH1C∗1 allele and 5 percent were homozygous. Twenty-three percent of Afro-Trinidadians had one ADH1C∗2 allele and 1 percent were homozygous. The allele was associated with alcohol dependence. Alcoholics with at least one ADH1C∗2 allele had elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase. Forty-one percent of the Afro-Trinidadians had at least one ADH1B∗3 allele, and three were homozygous. One Indo-Trinidadian had at least one ADH1B∗3 allele. Subjects with at least one ADH1B∗3 allele were less likely to be alcohol dependent and had lower alcohol consumption levels. Among alcohol dependent subjects, ADH1B∗3 was associated with significantly higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase. None of the subjects carried the ALDH2∗2 allele. About 10 percent of the people studied carried one copy of the ALDH1A1∗2 allele. Indo-Trinidadians with at least one ALDH1A1∗2 allele were more likely to be alcohol dependent.

Conclusions:

The presence of ADH1C∗1 in Indo-Trinidadians and ADH1B∗3 in Afro-Trinidadians is associated with reduced risk for alcoholism. The presence of at least one copy of the ALDH1A1∗2 allele was found to be associated with an increase in alcohol dependence in Indo-Trinidadians.

Type
Poster Session III: Alcoholism And Addiction
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2008

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