Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-ttgcf Total loading time: 0.296 Render date: 2021-04-12T17:10:01.628Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

Neurocognitive effects of atypical and conventional antipsychotic drugs in early-stage schizophrenia: a naturalistic 12-month follow-up study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

X. Guo
Affiliation:
Institute of Mental Health, the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China
B. Wang
Affiliation:
Chongqing Mental Health Center, Chongqing, China
C. Wang
Affiliation:
Beijing Anding Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
B. Hu
Affiliation:
Psychiatric Hospital of Jiangxi Province, Nanchang, China
X. Sun
Affiliation:
Mental Health Center of West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chenduo, China
L. Lv
Affiliation:
Mental Hospital of Henan Province, Xinxiang, China
Z. Lu
Affiliation:
Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai, China
C. Ma
Affiliation:
Guangzhou Brain Hospital, Guangzhou, China
T. Guo
Affiliation:
Hunan Brain Hospital, Changsha, China
S. Xie
Affiliation:
Nanjing Brain Hospital, Nanjing, China
Z. Liu
Affiliation:
Institute of Mental Health, the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China
J. Zhao
Affiliation:
Institute of Mental Health, the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China
Get access

Abstract

Introduction

The relative effect of the atypical antipsychotic drugs and conventional agents on neurocognition in patients with early-stage schizophrenia has not been comprehensively determined.

Aims

The present study aimed to assess the cognitive effects of atypical and conventional antipsychotic drugs on neurocognition under naturalistic treatment conditions.

Objectives

In a 12 months open-label, multicenter study, 698 patients with early-stage schizophrenia (< 5 years) were monotherapy with chlorpromazine, sulpiride, clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine or aripiprazole. Wechsler Memory Scale--Revised Visual Reproduction Test, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised Digit Symbol Test and Digit-span Task Test, Trail Making Tests Part A and Part B, and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test were administered at baseline and 12 months follow-up evaluation. The primary outcome was change in a cognitive composite score after 12 months of treatment.

Results

Compared with scores at baseline, the composite cognitive test scores and individual test scores had significant improvement for all seven treatment groups at 12-month follow-up evaluation (all p-values ≤ 0.013). However, olanzapine and quetiapine provided greater improvement than that provided by chlorpromazine and sulpiride in the composite score, processing speed and executive function (all p-values ≤ 0.045).

Conclusions

Both conventional and atypical antipsychotic medication long-term maintenance treatment can benefit congitive function in patients with early-stage schizophrenia, but olanzapine and quetiapine may be superior to chlorpromazine and sulpiride in improving some areas of neurocognitive function.

Type
P03-367
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 6 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 16th April 2020 - 12th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Neurocognitive effects of atypical and conventional antipsychotic drugs in early-stage schizophrenia: a naturalistic 12-month follow-up study
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Neurocognitive effects of atypical and conventional antipsychotic drugs in early-stage schizophrenia: a naturalistic 12-month follow-up study
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Neurocognitive effects of atypical and conventional antipsychotic drugs in early-stage schizophrenia: a naturalistic 12-month follow-up study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *