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1857 – Peer Relationships And Adolescents Mental Health: Finding From The Seyle Project In Italy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2020


M. Iosue
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy
V. Carli
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy National Prevention of Suicide and Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
M. D’Aulerio
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy
F. Basilico
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy
L. Recchia
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy
A. Apter
Affiliation:
Schneider Children Medical Center of Israel, Clalit Health Service, Tel Aviv, Israel
J. Balazs
Affiliation:
Vadaskert Child Psychiatry Hospital and Outpatient Clinic Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
J. Bobes
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain
R. Brunner
Affiliation:
Department Clinic of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
P. Corcoran
Affiliation:
National Suicide Research Foundation, Cork, Ireland
D. Cosman
Affiliation:
Clinical Psychology Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
T. Durkee
Affiliation:
National Prevention of Suicide and Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
C. Haring
Affiliation:
Research Division for Mental Health, University for Medical Information Technology, Innsbruck, Austria
J.P. Kahn
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, Nancy University Medical Center, Nancy, France
H. Keeley
Affiliation:
National Suicide Research Foundation, Cork, Ireland
D. Marusic
Affiliation:
Mental Health Department, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia
V. Postuvan
Affiliation:
Mental Health Department, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia
F. Resch
Affiliation:
Department Clinic of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
P. Saiz
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain
A. Varnik
Affiliation:
Estonian-Swedish Mental Health & Suicidology Institute, Tallin, Estonia
P. Varnik
Affiliation:
Estonian-Swedish Mental Health & Suicidology Institute, Tallin, Estonia
C. Wasserman
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA
C. Hoven
Affiliation:
Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA
M. Sarchiapone
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy
D. Wasserman
Affiliation:
National Prevention of Suicide and Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden


Abstract

Introduction

Peer relationships play a critical role in the development of adolescents, not only for the acquisition of social skills but also for the sense of personal identity and competence. Thus the quality of peer relationships influences actual and future mental health of the adolescent.

Objectives

SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) is a randomized controlled trial, funded by the EU, evaluating interventions for mental health promotion and suicide prevention. The study comprised 12,395 high-school students from 11 European countries.

Aims

We investigated the differences on psychological problems between students with poor and good peer relationships.

Methods

1,195 adolescents (mean age 15.3 ± 0.6; 68% females) from the Molise region constituted the Italian sample. Adolescents were identified as with poor peer relationships if they never or just sometimes get along with people of their age, feel that peers like having them in the group and feel that peers were kind and helpful. Psychometric measures were used to assess mental health problems such as depression (Beck Depression Inventory II), anxiety (Zung Self-Assessment Anxiety Scale), well-being (WHO-5) and suicidal ideation (Paykel Suicide Scale).

Results

Adolescents who reported poor peer relationships scored significantly higher (p < .005) on the scales assessing depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation and significantly lower (p < .001) on the WHO-5.

Conclusions

Particularly in adolescence peer relationships may influence psychological well-being and vice versa mental health influences the openness to the others. So promoting mental health and contemporary improve social skills could lead adolescents to a better life.


Type
Other
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2013
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