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Charlotta Hillerdal and Johannes Siapkas, eds. Debating Archaeological Empiricism: The Ambiguity of Material Evidence (Routledge Studies in Archaeology 18. New York: Routledge, 2015, viii+199pp., 16 figs., hbk, ISBN 978-0-415-74408-9) - Robert Chapman and Alison Wylie, eds. Material Evidence: Learning from Archaeological Practice (New York: Routledge, 2015, xx+361 pp., 69 figs., 3 maps, 5 tables, pbk, ISBN 978-0-415-83746-0) - Guy Gibbon. Critically Reading the Theory and Methods of Archaeology: An Introductory Guide (Lanham: AltaMira Press, 2014, viii+245pp., 5 illus., 4 tables, pbk, ISBN 978-0-7591-2341-0)

Review products

Charlotta Hillerdal and Johannes Siapkas, eds. Debating Archaeological Empiricism: The Ambiguity of Material Evidence (Routledge Studies in Archaeology 18. New York: Routledge, 2015, viii+199pp., 16 figs., hbk, ISBN 978-0-415-74408-9)

Robert Chapman and Alison Wylie, eds. Material Evidence: Learning from Archaeological Practice (New York: Routledge, 2015, xx+361 pp., 69 figs., 3 maps, 5 tables, pbk, ISBN 978-0-415-83746-0)

Guy Gibbon. Critically Reading the Theory and Methods of Archaeology: An Introductory Guide (Lanham: AltaMira Press, 2014, viii+245pp., 5 illus., 4 tables, pbk, ISBN 978-0-7591-2341-0)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Antonio Blanco-González*
Affiliation:
University of Valladolid, Spain

Abstract

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Type
Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 the European Association of Archaeologists 

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References

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