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Ketamine added to intravenous patient-controlled morphine: ketamine plasma concentration is unreliable

  • A. C. Van Elstraete (a1) and T. Lebrun (a1)

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Alain Van Elstraete, Département d'Anesthésie, Clinique Saint Paul, Clairière, 97200 Fort de France, Martinique, French West Indies. E-mail: alainvanel@hotmail.com; Tel: +596 61 97 78; Fax: +596 70 56 47

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References

Ünlügenç H, Özalevli M, Güler T, Işik G. Postoperative pain management with intravenous patient-controlled morphine: comparison of the effect of adding magnesium or ketamine. Eur J Anaesthesiol 2003; 20: 416421.
Leung A, Wallace M, Ridgeway B, Yaksh T. Concentration–effect relationship of intravenous alfentanil and ketamine on peripheral neurosensory threshold, allodynia and hyperalgesia of neuropathic pain. Pain 2001; 91: 177187.
Schmid R, Sandler A, Katz J. Use and efficacy of low-dose ketamine in the management of acute postoperative pain: a review of current techniques and outcomes. Pain 1999; 82: 111125.
Stubhaug A, Breivik H, Eide PK, Kreunen M, Foss A. Mapping of punctuate hyperalgesia around a surgical incision demonstrates that ketamine is a powerful suppressor of central sensitization to pain following surgery. Acta Anaesth Scand 1997; 41: 11241132.

Ketamine added to intravenous patient-controlled morphine: ketamine plasma concentration is unreliable

  • A. C. Van Elstraete (a1) and T. Lebrun (a1)

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