Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-9dmbd Total loading time: 0.232 Render date: 2021-02-24T21:12:49.434Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Management and outcome of patients undergoing thoracic surgery in a regional chest medical centre

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 August 2006

M. Licker
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesiology, Pharmacology and Surgical Intensive Care, Switzerland
A. Spiliopoulos
Affiliation:
Unit of Thoracic Surgery, Hospital of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
J.-G Frey
Affiliation:
Chest Medical Centre of Valais, Montana, Switzerland
M. De Perrot
Affiliation:
Unit of Thoracic Surgery, Hospital of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
C. Chevalley
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesiology, Pharmacology and Surgical Intensive Care, Switzerland
J.-M Tschopp
Affiliation:
Chest Medical Centre of Valais, Montana, Switzerland
Get access

Abstract

Background and objective The main objective of this study was to assess mortality and morbidity after thoracic surgery in a medical centre, without resident chest surgeons and anaesthesiologists, and to determine specific risk factors.

Methods A prospective cohort study using a local database which includes patients’ clinical characteristics, results of preoperative investigations, surgical and anaesthesia data and all postoperative complications was undertaken. Two hundred and seventy-three consecutive patients undergoing thoracic surgery from 1992 to 1999 were studied. The referral chest medical centre was without resident thoracic surgeons or anaesthesiologists; postoperative care was led by local chest physicians according to standardized protocols and in close collaboration with university-based surgeons and anaesthesiologists.

Results The majority of patients had lung cancer (71%) and underwent resection of at least one lobe (62%). Thirty-day mortality rate was 2.2% and one or more complications occurred in 74 patients (27%). Three patients had to be transferred to a university hospital for further treatment. Univariate predictors of complications included age (> 70 years), history of smoking, body mass index, as well as the extent and duration of surgery. After multiple logistic regression analysis, smoking (current or past), prolonged surgery (>120 min) and major lung resection (pneumonectomy or bilobectomy) remained the only independent risk factors.

Conclusions Overall perioperative mortality and morbidity rates did not exceed those reported from large teaching hospitals. In selected patients, thoracic surgery can be safely performed in a specialized chest medical centre without on-site surgeons and anaesthesiologists.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
2001 European Society of Anaesthesiology

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 1 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 24th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Management and outcome of patients undergoing thoracic surgery in a regional chest medical centre
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Management and outcome of patients undergoing thoracic surgery in a regional chest medical centre
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Management and outcome of patients undergoing thoracic surgery in a regional chest medical centre
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *