Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-zqvvz Total loading time: 2.312 Render date: 2021-04-14T06:03:33.063Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Malignant hyperthermia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 August 2006

F. Wappler
Affiliation:
Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany
Get access

Abstract

Malignant hyperthermia is an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder of the skeletal muscle cell characterized by a hypermetabolic response to all commonly used inhalational anaesthetics and depolarizing muscle relaxants. The clinical syndrome includes muscle rigidity, hypercapnia, tachycardia and myoglobinuria as result of increased carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption and muscle membrane breakdown. In human beings and animals susceptible to malignant hyperthermia, it is generally accepted that an increase in the level of myoplasmic free calcium is the cause of the syndrome. Various hypotheses have been proposed to account for the increase of intracellular calcium levels, e.g. a defect in the calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (ryanodine receptor), an abnormality of the excitation-contraction coupling mechanisms, or alterations in second messenger systems of skeletal muscles. This review gives an overview of the main features of this disease and recent advances in research including pathophysiology, treatment, diagnosis and genetics as well as association with other disorders.

Type
Review
Copyright
2001 European Society of Anaesthesiology

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 1 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 14th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Malignant hyperthermia
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Malignant hyperthermia
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Malignant hyperthermia
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *