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Closed system anaesthesia – historical aspects and recent developments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2006

P. Schober
Affiliation:
Vu Medisch Centrum, Department of Anaesthesiology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
S. A. Loer
Affiliation:
Vu Medisch Centrum, Department of Anaesthesiology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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Abstract

Summary

Closed circuit anaesthesia was described decades ago but did not achieve wide popularity among anaesthesiologists mainly because reliable control of inspiratory gas concentrations was not possible. Recent innovations including fast gas analysers, electronically controlled dosage systems and algorithms for feedback control have made possible the development of sophisticated closed circuit ventilators designed for routine clinical practice. The main advantages comprise economic use of medical gases and volatile anaesthetics, reduction of anaesthetic gas loss into the atmosphere, improved airway acclimatization as well as estimations of oxygen consumption. This article reviews historical aspects, recent developments as well as advantages and limitations of closed system anaesthesia.

Type
Review
Copyright
2006 European Society of Anaesthesiology

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