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Stars on Double Duty: Probing Cool Gas in Galaxies at Z ∼ 0.6 with Stellar Light

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2012

K.H.R. Rubin
Affiliation:
University of California Observatories, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. e-mail: rubin@ucolick.org
J.X. Prochaska
Affiliation:
University of California Observatories, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. e-mail: rubin@ucolick.org
D.C. Koo
Affiliation:
University of California Observatories, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. e-mail: rubin@ucolick.org
A.C. Phillips
Affiliation:
University of California Observatories, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. e-mail: rubin@ucolick.org
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Abstract

The luminous components of galaxies can act as powerful probes of halo gas in foreground galaxies along the sightline. We use Keck/LRIS absorption-line spectroscopy of a luminous, blue background galaxy at z = 0.69 to study Mg II halo gas in the outskirts (ρ = 11.1h−1kpc) of a massive, poststarburst galaxy in the foreground at z = 0.47. The foreground absorber shows signs of recent merger activity and is host to a low-luminosity AGN. The halo absorption we observe is extremely strong (Wr(2796) = 4.0 ± 0.1Å) and is indicative of a large Mg II gas velocity width (> 400kms−1). We briefly discuss the possible origins of this absorption, including multiphase cooling of hot halo gas and galactic winds/outflows.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© EAS, EDP Sciences, 2012

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References

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Stars on Double Duty: Probing Cool Gas in Galaxies at Z ∼ 0.6 with Stellar Light
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Stars on Double Duty: Probing Cool Gas in Galaxies at Z ∼ 0.6 with Stellar Light
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