Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

A Compact Dust Shell in the Symbiotic System HM Sagittae

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 April 2008

S. Sacuto
Affiliation:
Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, Dpt. Gemini-CNRS-UMR 6203, Avenue Copernic, 06130 Grasse, France
O. Chesneau
Affiliation:
Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, Dpt. Gemini-CNRS-UMR 6203, Avenue Copernic, 06130 Grasse, France
M. Vannier
Affiliation:
ESO, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura. Casilla 19001, Santiago 19, Chile
P. Cruzalèbes
Affiliation:
Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, Dpt. Gemini-CNRS-UMR 6203, Avenue Copernic, 06130 Grasse, France
Get access

Abstract

We present high spatial resolution observations of the mid-infrared core of the dusty symbiotic system HM Sge. The MIDI interferometer was used with the VLT Unit Telescopes and Auxiliary Telescopes providing baselines oriented from PA=42° to 105°. The MIDI visibilities are compared with the ones predicted in the frame of various spherical dust shells published in the literature involving single or double dusty shells intended to account for the influence of the hot White Dwarf. The mid-IR environment is unresolved by a 8m telescope and the MIDI spectrum exhibits a level similar to the ISO spectra recorded 10 yr ago. The discrepancies between the HWHM at different angle orientations suggest an increasing level of asymmetry from 13 to 8 μm. The observations are surprisingly well fitted by the densest (optically thick in the N band) and smallest spherical model published in the literature based on the ISO data, although such a model does not account for the variations of near-IR photometry due to the Mira pulsation cycle suggesting a much smaller optical thickness. These observations also discard the two shells models, developed in an attempt to take into account the effect of the White Dwarf illumination onto the dusty wind of the Mira. These models are too extended, and lead to a level of asymmetry of the dusty environment tightly constrained by the MIDI visibilities. These observations show that a high rate of dust formation is occurring in the vicinity of the Mira which seems to be not highly perturbed by the hot companion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© EAS, EDP Sciences, 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 3 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 25th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-898fc554b-t4g97 Total loading time: 0.417 Render date: 2021-01-25T11:58:58.845Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A Compact Dust Shell in the Symbiotic System HM Sagittae
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

A Compact Dust Shell in the Symbiotic System HM Sagittae
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

A Compact Dust Shell in the Symbiotic System HM Sagittae
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *