Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-66d7dfc8f5-4x9sz Total loading time: 0.742 Render date: 2023-02-08T18:18:58.168Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Relevance of recent genetic studies for social psychiatry

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 October 2011

Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Editorials
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1998

References

BIBLIOGRAFIA

Kendler, K.S. & Eaves, L. (1986). Models for the joint effect of genotype and environment on liability to psychiatric illness. American Journal of Psychiatry 143, 279289.Google ScholarPubMed
Neale, M.C. & Cardon, L.R. (1992). Methodology for Genetic Studies of Twins and Families. Kluwer Academic Publishers: Dordrecht, Netherlands.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Neale, M.C., Heath, A.C., Hewitt, J.K., Eaves, L.J. & Fulker, D.W. (1989). Fitting genetic models with LISREL: hypothesis testing. Behavior Genetics 19, 3750.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Risch, N. & Merikangas, K. (1996). The future of genetic studies of complex human diseases. Science 273, 15161517.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Serretti, A., Macciardi, F. & Smeraldi, E. (1997). Identification of symptomatological patterns common to major psychoses: proposal for a phenotype definition. American Journal of Medical Genetic (Neuropsychiatric Genetics) 67, 393400.3.0.CO;2-E>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smeraldi, E. & Macciardi, F. (1995). Association and linkage studies in mental illness. Clinical Psychiatry 1, 97110.Google Scholar
You have Access

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Relevance of recent genetic studies for social psychiatry
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Relevance of recent genetic studies for social psychiatry
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Relevance of recent genetic studies for social psychiatry
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *