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Factors leading to bad social outcome in subjects with psychosis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 October 2011

Vittorio Di Michele
Affiliation:
Mental Health Trust, Pescara, Italy
Francesca Bolino
Affiliation:
Mental Health Trust, Pescara, Italy
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

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Type
Editorials
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2004

References

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