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Depression and mortality following myocardial infarction: the issue of disease severity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 October 2011

Douglas Carroll
Affiliation:
School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Deirdre Lane
Affiliation:
School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

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Type
Editorials
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2002

References

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