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Prenatal determinants of schizophrenia: what we have learned thus far?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 October 2011


Michaeline Bresnahan
Affiliation:
New York State Psychiatric Institute and Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University, New York, NY, (USA)
Catherine A. Schaefer
Affiliation:
Kaiser Pennanente Division of Research, Oakland, CA, (USA)
Alan S. Brown
Affiliation:
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University, New York, NY, (USA)
Ezra S. Susser
Affiliation:
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University, New York, NY, (USA)
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

The Prenatal Determinants of Schizophrenia (PDS) study was designed to examine early antecedents to schizophrenia. Based in the Child Health and Development Study cohort assembled in 1959-1967, over 12,000 cohort members were followed in the PDS study for psychiatric disorders. Using the extensive data and biological samples prospectively collected beginning during pregnancy, PDS investigators have examined the influence of prenatal exposures on risk of schizophrenia in adulthood. Here we describe a few key findings from the PDS with respect to prenatal infection, nutrition, and toxic exposures.

Declaration of Interest: Supported by the Lieber Center for Schizophrenia Research, and the following grants: NIMH 1R01MH 63264-01A1 (A.S.B.), NIMH 1R01MH-60249 (A.S.B.), 1R01MH-60249-03S2 (A.S.B.), 1K02MH65422-01 (A.S.B.), aNARSAD Independent Investigator Award (A.S.B.).


Type
Special Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2005

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References

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