Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-cvrnb Total loading time: 0.864 Render date: 2021-04-13T19:30:59.205Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Drug attitude and subjective well-being in antipsychotic treatment monotherapy in real-world settings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 April 2011

Matteo Balestrieri
Affiliation:
Clinica di Psichiatria, Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, DPMSC, University of Udine, Udine
Guido Di Sciascio
Affiliation:
Azienda Universitaria Ospedale Policlinico, Bari
Miriam Isola
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Ricerche Mediche e Morfologiche, University of Udine, Udine
Emanuele Lomonaco
Affiliation:
Struttura Complessa di Psichiatria, Dipartimento di Salute Mentale, ASL 12 Biella
Elisa Maso
Affiliation:
Clinica di Psichiatria, Inter-University Centre for Behavioural Neurosciences, DPMSC, University of Udine, Udine
Roberto Merli
Affiliation:
Struttura Complessa di Psichiatria, Dipartimento di Salute Mentale, ASL 12 Biella
Salvatore Calò
Affiliation:
Azienda Universitaria Ospedale Policlinico, Bari
Cesario Bellantuono
Affiliation:
Sezione di Psichiatria, Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona

Summary

Aims – To assess using two well-know scales (DAI-30 and SWN) the drug attitude and subjective well-being of patients treated with haloperidol or second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) in four different Italian communities. Methods – The sample included 145 patients taking five different antipsychotics (APs) in mono-therapy: haloperidol, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine. A stepwise multiple regression analysis (SMRA) was used to analyse the contribution of different AP treatments and of other predictors to SWN and DAI-30 scores. Results – Univariate analyses showed no differences in DAI-30 and SWN scores across treatments. The SMRA showed that SWN scores were negatively correlated with the severity of the psychoses (BPRS scores), while the DAI-30 scores were negatively correlated with the severity of the psychoses and positively correlated both with the length of drug treatment and with the use of olanzapine. Conclusions – Our study does not confirm a better drug attitude in patients treated with SGA with respect to haloperidol. The only partial exception is the better performance of olanzapine over haloperidol on DAI-30, which could be due to the lower use of anticholinergic drugs during olanzapine treatment. The differences between the SWN and DAI-30 may give good reason for the use of both instruments during AP treatments.

Declaration of Interest: No grants have been received for this study. In the last two years: Matteo Balestrieri has received grants from AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly, BMS, Janssen-Cilag, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Innova-Pharma, Pfizer, Bristol, Abbott, Lundbeck; Guido Di Sciascio has received grants from AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly, BMS, Janssen-Cilag, Sanofi-Aventis, Wyeth, Boehringer- Ingelheim; Elisa Maso has received grants from Pfizer; Cesario Bellantuono has received grants from Eli Lilly, BMS, Boehringer- Ingelheim, Innova-Pharma, Italfarmaco; The other authors have not received any grants in the last two years.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1999

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Awad, A.G. & Voruganti, L. (2004). New antipsychotics, compliance, quality of life and subjective tolerability: are patients better off? Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 49, 171176.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Balestrieri, M., Giaroli, G., Mazzi, M. & Bellantuono, C. (2006). Performance of the Italian Version of the Subjective-Well-being Under Neuroleptics (SWN) Scale in Schizophrenic Outpatients. Pharmacopsychiatry 39, 14.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buckley, P.F., Harvey, P.D., Bowie, C.R. & Loebel, A. (2007). The relationship between symptomatic remission and neuropsychological improvement in schizophrenia patients switched to treatment with ziprasidone. Schizophrenia Research 94, 99106.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Day, J.C., Bentall, R.P., Roberts, C., Randall, F., Rogers, A., Cattell, D., Healy, D., Rae, P. & Power, Ch. (2005). Attitudes Toward Antipsychotic Medication. The Impact of Clinical Variables and Relationships With Health Professionals. Archives of General Psychiatry 62, 717724.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
de Girolamo, G., Bellini, M., Bocchia, S. & Ruggeri, M. (1994). Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale versione 4.0 ampliata (BPRS 4.0). Epidemiologia e Psichiatria Sociale 4, 6985.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
de Girolamo, G., Bassi, M., Neri, G., Ruggeri, M., Santone, G. & Picardi, A. (2007). The current state of mental health care in Italy: problems, perspectives, and lessons to learn. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 257, 8391.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
de Millas, W., Lambert, M. & Naber, D. (2006). The impact of subjective well-being under neuroleptic treatment on compliance and remission. Dialogues in Clinical Neurosciences 8, 131136.Google ScholarPubMed
Freudenreich, O., Cather, C., Eden, Evins E., Henderson, D.C. & Goff, D.C. (2004). Attitudes of schizophrenic outpatients toward psychiatric medications: relationship to clinical variables. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 65, 13721376.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Haro, J.M, Novick, D., Suarez, D. Alonso Jordi, Lepine, J.P., Ratcliffe, M. & the SOHO Study Group (2006). Remission and relapse in the outpatient care of schizophrenia. Three-year results from the Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes Study. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology 26, 571578.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hogan, T.P., Awad, A.G. & Eastwood, R. (1983). A self-report scale predictive of drug compliance in schizophrenics: reliability and discriminate validity. Psychological Medicine 13, 177183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Karow, A., Czekalla, J., Dittmann, R.W, Schacht, A., Wagner, T., Lambert, M., Schimmelmann B.G. & Naber D. (2007). Association of subjective well-being, symptoms and side effects with compliance after 12 months of treatment in schizophrenia. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 68, 7580.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lambert, M., Naber, D., Eich, F.X., Schacht, M., Linden, M. & Schimmelmann, B.G. (2007). Remission of severely impaired subjective wellbeing in 727 patients with schizophrenia treated with amisulpride. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 115,106113.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lieberman, J.A., Stroup, T.S., McEvoy, J.P., Swartz, M.S., Rosenheck, R.A., Perkins, D.O., Keefe, R.S.E., Davis, S.M., Davis, C.E., Lebowitz, B.D., Severe, J. & Hsiao, J.K., for the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) Investigators (2005). Effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs in patients with chronic schizophrenia. New England Journal of Medicine 353, 12091223.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Marder, S.R. (2005). Subjective experiences on antipsychotic medications: synthesis and conclusions. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 111, Suppl. 427, 4346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Naber, D. (1995). A self-rating to measure subjective effects of neuroleptic drugs, relationships to objective psychopathology, quality of life and other clinical variables. International Clinical Psychopharmacology 10, Suppl. 3, 133138.Google Scholar
Naber, D. (2008). Subjective effects of antipsychotic drugs and their relevance for compliance and remission. Epidemiologia e Psichiatria Sociale 17, 174176.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Naber, D., Moritz, S., Lambert, M., Pajonk, F.G., Holzbach, R., Mass, R. & Andresen, B. (2001). Improvement of schizophrenic patients’ subjective well-being under atypical antipsychotic drugs. Schizophrenia Research 50, 7988.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Naber, D., Karow, A. & Lambert, M. (2005). Subjective well-being under tha neuroleptic treatment and its relevance for compliance. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Suppl. 427, 2934.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Phillips, G.A., van, Brunt D.L, Roychowdhury, S.M., Xu, W. & Naber, D. (2006). The relationship between quality of life and clinical efficacy from a randomized trial comparing olanzapine and ziprasidone. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 67, 13971403.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rossi, A., Arduini, L., De Cataldo, S. & Stratta, P. (2001). Subjective response to neuroleptic medication: a validation study of the Italian version of the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI). Epidemiologia e Psichiatria Sociale 10, 107114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tiihonen, J., Wahlbeck, K., Lönnqvist, J., Klaukka, T., Ioannidis, J.P.A., Volavka, J. & Haukka, J. (2006). Effectiveness of antipsychotic treatments in a nationwide cohort of patients in community care after first hospitalisation due to schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder: observational follow-up study. British Medical Journal 333, 224CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Voruganti, L. & Awad, A.G. (2005). Brain imaging research on subjective responses to psychotropic drugs. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 111, Suppl. 427, 2228.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Watson, P.W., Garety, P.A., Weinman, J., Dunn, G., Bebbington, P.E., Fowler, D., Freeman, D. & Kuipers, E. (2006). Emotional dysfunction in schizophrenia spectrum psychosis: the role of illness perceptions. Psychological Medicine 36, 761770.Google ScholarPubMed
Wehmeier, P.M., Kluge, M., Schacht, A., Helsberg, K., Schreiber, W., Schimmelmann, B.G. & Lambert, M. (2008). Patterns of physician and patient rated quality of life during antipsychotic treatment in outpatients with schizophrenia. Journal of Psychiatric Research 42, 676–83.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 18 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 13th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Drug attitude and subjective well-being in antipsychotic treatment monotherapy in real-world settings
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Drug attitude and subjective well-being in antipsychotic treatment monotherapy in real-world settings
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Drug attitude and subjective well-being in antipsychotic treatment monotherapy in real-world settings
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *