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Zero-inflated negative binomial mixed model: an application to two microbial organisms important in oesophagitis

  • R. FANG (a1), B. D. WAGNER (a1) (a2) (a3), J. K. HARRIS (a2) (a3) and S. A. FILLON (a4)

Summary

Altered microbial communities are thought to play an important role in eosinophilic oesophagitis, an allergic inflammatory condition of the oesophagus. Identification of the majority of organisms present in human-associated microbial communities is feasible with the advent of high throughput sequencing technology. However, these data consist of non-negative, highly skewed sequence counts with a large proportion of zeros. In addition, hierarchical study designs are often performed with repeated measurements or multiple samples collected from the same subject, thus requiring approaches to account for within-subject variation, yet only a small number of microbiota studies have applied hierarchical regression models. In this paper, we describe and illustrate the use of a hierarchical regression-based approach to evaluate multiple factors for a small number of organisms individually. More specifically, the zero-inflated negative binomial mixed model with random effects in both the count and zero-inflated parts is applied to evaluate associations with disease state while adjusting for potential confounders for two organisms of interest from a study of human microbiota sequence data in oesophagitis.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr B. D. Wagner, Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, University of Colorado, 13001 East 17th Place, Campus Box B119, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. (Email: Brandie.Wagner@ucdenver.edu)

References

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