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Will integrated surveillance systems for vectors and vector-borne diseases be the future of controlling vector-borne diseases? A practical example from China

  • Y. WU (a1), F. LING (a1), J. HOU (a1), S. GUO (a1), J. WANG (a1) and Z. GONG (a1)...

Summary

Vector-borne diseases are one of the world's major public health threats and annually responsible for 30–50% of deaths reported to the national notifiable disease system in China. To control vector-borne diseases, a unified, effective and economic surveillance system is urgently needed; all of the current surveillance systems in China waste resources and/or information. Here, we review some current surveillance systems and present a concept for an integrated surveillance system combining existing vector and vector-borne disease monitoring systems. The integrated surveillance system has been tested in pilot programmes in China and led to a 21·6% cost saving in rodent-borne disease surveillance. We share some experiences gained from these programmes.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr Z. Gong, 3399 Binsheng Road, Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Binjiang, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China. (Email: Zhygong@cdc.zj.cn)

References

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