Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Web survey-based selection of controls for epidemiological analyses of a multi-prefectural outbreak of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 in Japan associated with consumption of self-grilled beef hanging tender

  • Y. Yahata (a1), N. Ohshima (a2), F. Odaira (a1) (a3), N. Nakamura (a1) (a4), H. Ichikawa (a2), H. Ichikawa (a2), K. Matsuno (a2), J. Shuri (a2), T. Toyozawa (a2), J. Terajima (a1) (a5), H. Watanabe (a1) (a6), K. Nakashima (a1) (a7), T. Sunagawa (a1), K. Taniguchi (a1) (a8) and N. Okabe (a1) (a9)...

Abstract

An outbreak of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 occurred in multiple prefectures of Japan in November 2009. We conducted two case–control studies with trace-back and trace-forward investigations to determine the source. The case definition was met by 21 individuals; 14 (66.7%) were hospitalised, but no haemolytic uraemic syndrome, acute encephalopathy or deaths occurred. Median age was 23 (range 12–48) years and 14 cases were male (66.7%). No significant associations with food were found in a case–control study by local public health centres, but our matched case–control study using Internet surveys found that beef hanging tender (or hanger steak), derived from the diaphragm of the cattle, was significantly associated with illness (odds ratio = 15.77; 95% confidence interval, 2.00–124.11). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of isolates from patients and the suspected food showed five different patterns: two in faecal and food samples, and another three in patient faecal samples only, although there were epidemiological links to the meat consumed at the restaurants. Trace-back investigation implicated a common food processing company from outside Japan. Examination of the logistics of the meat processing company suggested that contamination did not occur in Japan. We concluded that the source of the outbreak was imported hanging tender. This investigation revealed that Internet surveys could be useful for outbreak investigations.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Web survey-based selection of controls for epidemiological analyses of a multi-prefectural outbreak of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 in Japan associated with consumption of self-grilled beef hanging tender
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Web survey-based selection of controls for epidemiological analyses of a multi-prefectural outbreak of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 in Japan associated with consumption of self-grilled beef hanging tender
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Web survey-based selection of controls for epidemiological analyses of a multi-prefectural outbreak of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 in Japan associated with consumption of self-grilled beef hanging tender
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Y. Yahata, E-mail: yahata@nih.go.jp

References

Hide All
1. Riley, LW, et al. (1983) Hemorrhagic colitis associated with a rare Escherichia coli serotype. New England Journal of Medicine 308(12), 681685.
2. Nathanson, S, et al. (2010) Acute neurological involvement in diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome. Clinical Journal of American Society of Nephrology 5(7), 12181228.
3. Pavia, AT, et al. (1990) Hemolytic-uremic syndrome during an outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections in institutions for mentally retarded persons: clinical and epidemiologic observations. Journal of Pediatrics 116(4), 544551.
4. Brandt, JR, et al. (1994) Escherichia coli O157:H7-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome after ingestion of contaminated hamburgers. Journal of Pediatrics 125(4), 519526.
5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (1996) Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection – Georgia and Tennessee, June 1995. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 45(12), 249251.
6. Sinclair, C, et al. (2017) Investigation of a national outbreak of STEC Escherichia coli O157 using online consumer panel control methods: Great Britain, October 2014. Epidemiology & Infection 45(5), 864871.
7. White, A, et al. (2016) Food source prediction of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli outbreaks using demographic and outbreak characteristics, United States, 1998–2014. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 13(10), 527534.
8. Byrne, L, et al. (2016) Epidemiological and microbiological investigation of an outbreak of severe disease from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 infection associated with consumption of a slaw garnish. Journal of Food Protection 9(7), 11611168.
9. Butcher, H, et al. (2016) Whole genome sequencing improved case ascertainment in an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 associated with raw drinking milk. Epidemiology & Infection 44(13), 28122823.
10. Crowe, SJ, et al. (2015) Vital signs: multistate foodborne outbreaks – United States, 2010–2014. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 4(43), 12211225.
11. Kanayama, A, et al. (2015) Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli outbreaks related to childcare facilities in Japan, 2010–2013. BMC Infectious Diseases 15: 539.
12. Saitou, T, et al. (2012) Analysis of antibody levels to Escherichia coli O-antigen (serogroups O157, O26, O111, O145, O103, O121 and O165) in HUS patients [in Japanese]. Infectious Agents Surveillance Report 33: 128130.
13. Jay, MT, et al. (2004) A multistate outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection linked to consumption of beef tacos at a fast-food restaurant chain. Clinical Infectious Diseases 39(1), 17.
14. Marder, EP, et al. (2014) Multistate outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 associated with bagged salad. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 11(8), 593595.
15. Neil, KP, et al. (2012) A novel vehicle for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to humans: multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections associated with consumption of ready-to-bake commercial prepackaged cookie dough – United States, 2009. Clinical Infectious Diseases 54(4), 511518.
16. Slayton, RB, et al. (2013) Outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 associated with romaine lettuce consumption, 2011. PLoS ONE 8(2), e55300.
17. Wendel, AM, et al. (2009) Multistate outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection associated with consumption of packaged spinach, August–September 2006: the Wisconsin investigation. Clinical Infectious Diseases 48(8), 10791086.
18. Rothman, KJ and Sander Greenland, SR (1998) Modern Epidemiology, 2nd edn. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, pp. 111127.
19. Flanders, WD and Austin, H (1986) Possibility of selection bias in matched case-control studies using friend controls. American Journal of Epidemiology 124(1), 150153.
20. Dillman, DA, Smyth, JD and Christian, LM (2014) Internet, Phone, Mail, and Mixed-Mode Surveys: The Tailored Design Method. 4th edn. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc., pp. 398449.
21. Mook, P, et al. (2016) Selection of population controls for a Salmonella case-control study in the UK using a market research panel and web-survey provides time and resource savings. Epidemiology & Infection 144(6), 12201230.
22. Yahata, Y, et al. (2015) Epidemiological analysis of a large enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O111 outbreak in Japan associated with haemolytic uraemic syndrome and acute encephalopathy. Epidemiology & Infection 143(13), 27212732.
23. WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Escherichia and Klebsiella (2017) Identification of three vtx1 and seven vtx2 subtypes of Verocytotoxin encoding genes of Escherichia coli by conventional PCR amplification Version 6. Available at https://www.ssi.dk/~/media/Indhold/EN%20-%20engelsk/Public%20Health/National%20Reference%20Laboratories/vtx%20detection%20%20subtyping%20protocolrev6final.pdf. (Accessed 18 December 2017).
24. Terajima, J, et al. (2002) High genomic diversity of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli isolates in Japan and its applicability for the detection of diffuse outbreak. Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases 55(1), 1922.
25. Brown, MH (2000) HACCP in the Meat Industry. Cambridge: Published in North and South America by CRC Press LLC, pp. 39.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed