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Virucidal effect of chlorinated water containing cyanuric acid

  • T. Yamashita (a1), K. Sakae (a1), Y. Ishihara (a1), S. Isomura (a1) and H. Inoue (a1)...

Summary

The inhibitory influence of cyanuric acid on the virucidal effect of chlorine was studied. The time required for 99·9% inactivation of ten enteroviruses and two adenoviruses by 0·5 mg/l free available chlorine at pH 7·0 and 25C was prolonged approximately 4·8–28·8 times by the addition of 30 mg/l cyanuric acid. Comparative inactivation of poliovirus 1 by free available chlorine with or without cyanuric acid revealed the following. The inactivation rate by 1·5 mg/l free available chlorine with 30 mg/l cyanuric acid or by 0·5 mg/l free available chlorine with 1 mg/1 cyanuric acid was slower than by 0·5 mg/1 free available chlorine alone. Temperature and pH did not affect the inhibitory influence of cyanuric acid on the disinfectant action of chlorine. In the swimming-pool and tap water, cyanuric acid delayed the virucidal effect of chlorine as much as in the ‚clean’ condition of chlorine-buffered distilled water. The available chlorine value should be increased to 1·5 mg/l when cyanuric acid is used in swimming-pool water.

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Copyright

References

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Virucidal effect of chlorinated water containing cyanuric acid

  • T. Yamashita (a1), K. Sakae (a1), Y. Ishihara (a1), S. Isomura (a1) and H. Inoue (a1)...

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