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Validation of three geolocation strategies for health-facility attendees for research and public health surveillance in a rural setting in western Kenya

  • G. H. STRESMAN (a1), J. C. STEVENSON (a2) (a3) (a4), C. OWAGA (a3), E. MARUBE (a3), C. ANYANGO (a3), C. DRAKELEY (a1), T. BOUSEMA (a1) (a5) and J. COX (a2)...

Summary

Understanding the spatial distribution of disease is critical for effective disease control. Where formal address networks do not exist, tracking spatial patterns of clinical disease is difficult. Geolocation strategies were tested at rural health facilities in western Kenya. Methods included geocoding residence by head of compound, participatory mapping and recording the self-reported nearest landmark. Geocoding was able to locate 72·9% [95% confidence interval (CI) 67·7–77·6] of individuals to within 250 m of the true compound location. The participatory mapping exercise was able to correctly locate 82·0% of compounds (95% CI 78·9–84·8) to a 2 × 2·5 km area with a 500 m buffer. The self-reported nearest landmark was able to locate 78·1% (95% CI 73·8–82·1) of compounds to the correct catchment area. These strategies tested provide options for quickly obtaining spatial information on individuals presenting at health facilities.

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Copyright

The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution licence http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Ms. G. H. Stresman, Department of Immunology & Infection, Faculty of Infectious & Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK.

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Validation of three geolocation strategies for health-facility attendees for research and public health surveillance in a rural setting in western Kenya

  • G. H. STRESMAN (a1), J. C. STEVENSON (a2) (a3) (a4), C. OWAGA (a3), E. MARUBE (a3), C. ANYANGO (a3), C. DRAKELEY (a1), T. BOUSEMA (a1) (a5) and J. COX (a2)...

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