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Validation of the register-based lifetime antimicrobial usage measurement for finisher batches based on comparison with recorded antimicrobial usage at farm level

  • V. D. Andersen (a1), P. Munk (a1), L. V. de Knegt (a1), M. S. Jensen (a1), F. M. Aarestrup (a1) and H. Vigre (a1)...

Abstract

Assessing the relationship between antimicrobial usage (AMU) and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) requires the accurate and precise utilisation of register data. Therefore, validation of register-based data is essential for evaluating the quality and, subsequently, the internal validity of studies based on the data.

In this study, different smoothing methods for Veterinary Medicine Statistic Program database (VetStat)-records were validated by comparing these with farm-records. Comparison between measurements included accuracy as; completeness and correctness, and precision as; a relative difference of the error, correlation with Fisher's z transformation and reliability coefficient. The most valid methods of those examined were then used in re-analyses of the abundance of AMR genes in 10 finisher batches from a previous study.

Improved accuracy was found when detailed smoothing methods were applied. Although the precision also increased, the effect was not as pronounced, as the usage estimate of all smoothing methods deviated moderately compared with the farm-registrations. Applying the most valid methods to the 10 finisher batches increased estimates of statistical model fit for aminoglycosides, lincosamides, tetracyclines and decreased estimates of statistical model fit for macrolides. The estimates of statistical model fit for sulfonamides and broad-spectrum penicillins remained the same.

Through refined data transformation, VetStat-records can be used to calculate a daily amount of AMU per pig reflecting the true usage accurately and moderately precisely, which is the foundation for calculating lifetime AMU.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Vibe Dalhoff Andersen, E-mail: vdan@food.dtu.dk

References

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