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Ureaplasma urealyticum and U. parvum in sexually active women attending public health clinics in Brazil

  • T. N. LOBÃO (a1), G. B. CAMPOS (a1) (a2), N. N. SELIS (a2), A. T. AMORIM (a1), S. G. SOUZA (a2), S. S. MAFRA (a2), L. S. PEREIRA (a2), D. B. DOS SANTOS (a3), T. B. FIGUEIREDO (a2), L. M. MARQUES (a1) (a2) and J. TIMENETSKY (a1)...

Summary

Ureaplasma urealyticum and U. parvum have been associated with genital infections. The purpose of this study was to detect the presence of ureaplasmas and other sexually transmitted infections in sexually active women from Brazil and relate these data to demographic and sexual health, and cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β. Samples of cervical swab of 302 women were examined at the Family Health Units in Vitória da Conquista. The frequency of detection by conventional PCR was 76·2% for Mollicutes. In qPCR, the frequency found was 16·6% for U. urealyticum and 60·6% U. parvum and the bacterial load of these microorganisms was not significantly associated with signs and symptoms of genital infection. The frequency found for Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Gardnerella vaginalis and Chlamydia trachomatis was 3·0%, 21·5%, 42·4% and 1·7%, respectively. Higher levels of IL-1β were associated with control women colonized by U. urealyticum and U. parvum. Increased levels of IL-6 were associated with women who exhibited U. parvum. Sexually active women, with more than one sexual partner in the last 3 months, living in a rural area were associated with increased odds of certain U. parvum serovar infection.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: L. M. Marques, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil; Instituto Multidisciplinar em Saúde, Núcleo de Tecnologia em Saúde, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Brazil (Email: lucasm@ufba.br)

References

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Keywords

Ureaplasma urealyticum and U. parvum in sexually active women attending public health clinics in Brazil

  • T. N. LOBÃO (a1), G. B. CAMPOS (a1) (a2), N. N. SELIS (a2), A. T. AMORIM (a1), S. G. SOUZA (a2), S. S. MAFRA (a2), L. S. PEREIRA (a2), D. B. DOS SANTOS (a3), T. B. FIGUEIREDO (a2), L. M. MARQUES (a1) (a2) and J. TIMENETSKY (a1)...

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