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Trends in HCV prevalence, risk factors and distribution of viral genotypes in injecting drug users: findings from two cross-sectional studies

  • M. L. A. OLIVEIRA (a1), C. F. T. YOSHIDA (a2), P. R. TELLES (a3), M. A. HACKER (a4), S. A. N. OLIVEIRA (a2), J. C. MIGUEL (a2), K. M. R. do Ó (a2) and F. I. BASTOS (a5)...

Summary

In the last decade, a declining prevalence of HCV infection has been described in injecting drug users (IDUs) in different countries. This study is the first to assess temporal trends in drug-injecting patterns, HCV infection rates and viral genotype distribution in 770 Brazilian IDUs, recruited by two cross-sectional studies (1994–1997 and 1999–2001). A substantial decline in the prevalence of HCV infection was found over the years (75% in 1994 vs. 20·6% in 2001, P<0·001) that may be a consequence of the significant reduction in the overall frequencies of drug injection and needle-sharing, as well as the participation of IDUs in initiatives aimed at reducing drug-related harm. No trend was found in terms of viral genotype distribution. Despite the favourable scenario, preventive measures must be maintained, especially in vulnerable subgroups such as young or new injectors, where risky behaviours through direct and indirect sharing practices remain common.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr Maria de Lourdes Aguiar Oliveira, Laboratório de Referência Nacional para Influenza e Doenças Exantemáticas, Laboratório de Vírus Respiratórios e do Sarampo, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Av. Brasil, 4365, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 21040-360, Brazil. (Email: mlaoliveira@fiocruz.br)

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Keywords

Trends in HCV prevalence, risk factors and distribution of viral genotypes in injecting drug users: findings from two cross-sectional studies

  • M. L. A. OLIVEIRA (a1), C. F. T. YOSHIDA (a2), P. R. TELLES (a3), M. A. HACKER (a4), S. A. N. OLIVEIRA (a2), J. C. MIGUEL (a2), K. M. R. do Ó (a2) and F. I. BASTOS (a5)...

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