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A trend towards increasing viral load in newly diagnosed HIV-infected inpatients in southeast China

  • Y. CHEN (a1), Z. WANG (a1), A. HUANG (a1), J. YUAN (a1), D. WEI (a1) (a2) (a3) and H. YE (a1)...

Summary

Peripheral blood viral load is an important indicator of viral production and clearance. Previous studies have suggested that viral load might predict the rate of decrease in CD4+ cell count and progression to AIDS and death. Here, we conducted a retrospective analysis of the trends in HIV-1 viral load in southeast China. Among inpatients newly diagnosed with HIV infection, we found that viral load has increased over the past decade from 4·20 log10 copies/ml in 2002 to 6·61 log10 copies/ml in 2014, with a mean increase of 0·19 log10 copies/ml each year. However, the CD4+ cell count was stable and insensitive to changes in viral load. Thus, increasing viral load appears to be an emerging trend in newly diagnosed HIV-infected inpatients.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr D. Wei or Professor H. Ye, Xihong Road 312, Fuzhou 350025, Fujian Province, P.R. China. (Email: wei_dahai@hotmail.com) [D.W.] (Email: yehanhui@163.com) [H.Y.]

References

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A trend towards increasing viral load in newly diagnosed HIV-infected inpatients in southeast China

  • Y. CHEN (a1), Z. WANG (a1), A. HUANG (a1), J. YUAN (a1), D. WEI (a1) (a2) (a3) and H. YE (a1)...

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