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Sporadic Legionnaires' disease: the role of domestic electric hot-water tanks

  • S. F. DUFRESNE (a1), M. C. LOCAS (a1), A. DUCHESNE (a1), C. RESTIERI (a1), J. ISMAÏL (a2), B. LEFEBVRE (a2), A. C. LABBÉ (a1), R. DION (a2), M. PLANTE (a3) and M. LAVERDIÈRE (a1)...

Summary

Sporadic community-acquired legionellosis (SCAL) can be acquired through contaminated aerosols from residential potable water. Electricity-dependent hot-water tanks are widely used in the province of Quebec (Canada) and have been shown to be frequently contaminated with Legionella spp. We prospectively investigated the homes of culture-proven SCAL patients from Quebec in order to establish the proportion of patients whose domestic potable hot-water system was contaminated with the same Legionella isolate that caused their pneumonia. Water samples were collected in each patient's home. Environmental and clinical isolates were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Thirty-six patients were enrolled into the study. Legionella was recovered in 12/36 (33%) homes. The residential and clinical isolates were found to be microbiologically related in 5/36 (14%) patients. Contaminated electricity-heated domestic hot-water systems contribute to the acquisition of SCAL. The proportion is similar to previous reports, but may be underestimated.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: M. Laverdière, M.D., Department of Microbiology – Infectious Diseases, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, 5415 L'Assomption Boulevard, Montréal (Qc), Canada H1T 2M4. (Email: michel.laverdiere@umontreal.ca)

References

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Keywords

Sporadic Legionnaires' disease: the role of domestic electric hot-water tanks

  • S. F. DUFRESNE (a1), M. C. LOCAS (a1), A. DUCHESNE (a1), C. RESTIERI (a1), J. ISMAÏL (a2), B. LEFEBVRE (a2), A. C. LABBÉ (a1), R. DION (a2), M. PLANTE (a3) and M. LAVERDIÈRE (a1)...

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