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Sources of sporadic Yersinia enterocolitica infection in children in Sweden, 2004: a case-control study

  • S. BOQVIST (a1), H. PETTERSSON (a2), Å. SVENSSON (a3) and Y. ANDERSSON (a2)

Summary

Young children account for a large proportion of reported Yersinia enterocolitica infections in Sweden with a high incidence compared with other gastrointestinal infections, such as salmonellosis and campylobacteriosis. A case-control study was conducted to investigate selected risk factors for domestic sporadic yersiniosis in children aged 0–6 years in Sweden. In total, 117 cases and 339 controls were included in the study. To minimize exclusion of observations due to missing data a multiple non-parametric imputation technique was used. The following risk factors were identified in the multivariate analysis: eating food prepared from raw pork products (OR 3·0, 95% CI 1·8–5·1) or treated sausage (OR 1·9, 95% CI 1·1–3·3), use of a baby's dummy (OR 1·9, 95% CI 1·1–3·2) and contact with domestic animals (OR 2·0, 95% CI 1·2–3·4). We believe that the importance of Y. enterocolitica infection in children has been neglected and that results from this study can be used to develop preventive recommendations.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: S. Boqvist, DVM, Ph.D., Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 7009, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. (Email: Sofia.Boqvist@bvf.slu.se)

References

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