Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Source attribution of human Salmonella cases in Sweden

  • H. WAHLSTRÖM (a1), Y. ANDERSSON (a2), L. PLYM-FORSHELL (a3) and S. M. PIRES (a4)

Summary

The aim of this study was to identify the sources of sporadic domestic Salmonella cases in Sweden and to evaluate the usefulness of a source-attribution model in a country in which food animals are virtually free from Salmonella. The model allocates human sporadic domestic Salmonella cases to different sources according to distribution of Salmonella subtypes in the different sources. Sporadic domestic human Salmonella cases (n=1086) reported between July 2004 and June 2006 were attributed to nine food-animal and wildlife sources. Of all Salmonella cases, 82% were acquired abroad and 2·9% were associated with outbreaks. We estimated that 6·4% were associated with imported food, 0·5% with food-producing animals, and 0·6% with wildlife. Overall, 7·7% could not be attributed to any source. We concluded that domestic food-producing animals are not an important source for Salmonella in humans in Sweden, and that the adapted model is useful also in low-prevalence countries.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Source attribution of human Salmonella cases in Sweden
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Source attribution of human Salmonella cases in Sweden
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Source attribution of human Salmonella cases in Sweden
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr H. Wahlström, Zoonosis Center, National Veterinary Institute, PO Box 7073 751 89, Uppsala, Sweden. (Email: helene.wahlstrom@sva.se)

References

Hide All
1.National Veterinary Institute. Zoonoses in Sweden up to and including 1999. (http://www.sva.se/sv/navigera/tjanster_produkter/Trycksaker/Ovrigt-foldrar-etc/Zoonoses-in-Sweden-up-to-and-including-1999-/). Accessed 20 January 2010.
2.National Veterinary Institute. Annual Swedish zoonosis reports. (http://www.sva.se/sv/navigera/tjanster_produkter/Trycksaker/Zoonosrapporter/). Accessed 20 January 2010.
3.The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control. Data and statistics on Salmonella (http://www.smittskyddsinstitutet.se/in-english/statistics/salmonellosis/). Accessed 20 January 2010.
4.Hald, T, et al. A Bayesian approach to quantify the contribution of animal-food sources to human salmonellosis. Risk Analysis 2004; 24: 255269.
5.Valkenburg, S, et al. Zoonoses and zoonotic agents in humans, food, animals and feed in the Netherlands 2003–2006. RIVM, 2007. Report No. 330152001.
6.Danish Zoonosis Centre. Annual reports (http://www.dfvf.dk/Default.aspx?ID=9606). Accessed 12 December 2009.
7.Gelman, A, Rubin, DB. Inference from iterative simulation using multiple sequences. Statististical Science 1992; 7: 457472.
8.Hanning, IB, Nutt, JD, Ricke, SC. Salmonellosis outbreaks in the United States due to fresh produce: sources and potential intervention measures. Foodborne Pathogen and Disease; 2009; 6: 635648.
9.Task Force on Zoonoses Data Collection. Report of the Task Force on Zoonoses Data Collection on the analysis of the baseline survey on the prevalence of Salmonella in slaughter pigs, Part A. EFSA Journal 2008; 135, 1111.
10.Task Force on Zoonoses Data Collection. Report of the Task Force on Zoonoses Data Collection on the analysis of the baseline study on the prevalence of Salmonella in holdings of laying hen flocks of Gallus gallus. EFSA Journal 2007; 97, 184.
11.Task Force on Zoonoses Data Collection. Report of the Task Force on Zoonoses Data Collection on the analysis of the baseline survey on the prevalence of Salmonella in broiler flocks of Gallus gallus, Part A. EFSA Journal 2007; 98: 185.
12.Wahlström, H, et al. Salmonella Typhimurium phage typed at SVA [in Swedish]. SVA Vet 1999; 2–3: 2223.
13.Tauni, MA, Osterlund, A. Outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium in cats and humans associated with infection in wild birds. Journal of Small Animal Practice 2000; 41: 339341.
14.Anon. Epidemiological signs of spring? [in Swedish] Smittskydd 1996; 6: 57.
15.Nilsson, S. Current status of the control of tuberculosis [in Swedish]. Medlemsbladet Sveriges Veterinärförbund 1962; 14: 212221.
16.Lahti, E, et al. An outbreak of Salmonella reading affecting humans and animals in Sweden. In: The Third International Meeting on Emerging Diseases. Vienna, Austria, 13–19 February 2009.
17.Osterberg, J, et al. Feed-borne outbreak of Salmonella Cubana in Swedish pig farms: risk factors and factors affecting the restriction period in infected farms. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica 2006; 47: 1321.
18.Pires, SM, Hald, T. Assessing the differences in public health impact of salmonella subtypes using a bayesian microbial subtyping approach for source attribution. Foodborne Pathogen and Disease 2010; 7: 143151.

Keywords

Type Description Title
WORD
Supplementary materials

Wahlstrom Supplementary Material
Appendix.doc

 Word (274 KB)
274 KB

Source attribution of human Salmonella cases in Sweden

  • H. WAHLSTRÖM (a1), Y. ANDERSSON (a2), L. PLYM-FORSHELL (a3) and S. M. PIRES (a4)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed