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A simulation model to assess herd-level intervention strategies against E. coli O157

  • J. C. WOOD (a1), I. J. McKENDRICK (a1) and G. GETTINBY (a2)

Summary

A simulation model of a herd of grazing cattle, which has been developed to provide insight into the infection dynamics of E. coli O157 is described. The spatially explicit model enables the modelling of the infection transmission processes to be realistically addressed under field management conditions. The model is used to explore the efficacy of various potential control strategies in reducing the levels of within-herd infection. These measures include restricting the size of herds, niche engineering, improving housing hygiene and vaccination. While a vaccination strategy remains a hypothetical option, it has the potential to be particularly effective. It is likely that the most successful strategy will involve the implementation of a combination of measures.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr I. J. McKendrick, Biomathematics & Statistics Scotland, King's Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK. (Email: iain@bioss.ac.uk)

References

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A simulation model to assess herd-level intervention strategies against E. coli O157

  • J. C. WOOD (a1), I. J. McKENDRICK (a1) and G. GETTINBY (a2)

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