Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-9mfzn Total loading time: 0.312 Render date: 2021-04-16T18:11:47.836Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Risk factors for Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 and non-DT104 infection: a Canadian multi-provincial case-control study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 May 2004

K. DORÉ
Affiliation:
Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Infections Division, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
J. BUXTON
Affiliation:
Field Epidemiology Training Program, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
B. HENRY
Affiliation:
Toronto Public Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
F. POLLARI
Affiliation:
Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Infections Division, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
D. MIDDLETON
Affiliation:
Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care, Disease Control Service, Public Health Branch, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
M. FYFE
Affiliation:
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
R. AHMED
Affiliation:
National Laboratory for Enteric Pathogens, Health Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
P. MICHEL
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada
A. KING
Affiliation:
Bureau of Immunization, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
C. TINGA
Affiliation:
Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Infections Division, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
J. B. WILSON
Affiliation:
Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Infections Division, Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Guelph, Ontario, Canada Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

To identify risk factors for sporadic Salmonella Typhimurium definitive phage-type 104 (DT104) and non-DT104 diarrhoeal illness in Canada, we conducted a matched case-control study between 1999 and 2000. Cases were matched 1[ratio ]1 on age and province of residence. Multivariate analysis suggested that recent antibiotic use [odds ratio (OR) 5·2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·8–15·3], living on a livestock farm (OR 4·9, 95% CI 1·9–18·9), and recent travel outside Canada (OR 4·1, 95% CI 1·2–13·8) are independent risk factors for DT104 illness. Similar analyses suggested that recent travel outside North America is a sizable risk factor for non-DT104 illness (OR 66·8, 95% CI 6·7–665·3). No food exposure was a risk factor in either analysis. Educating health-care providers and the public about appropriate antibiotic use and antimicrobial resistance is important. Appropriate administration of antibiotics to livestock, particularly cattle, and hygienic measures such as handwashing after contact with farm animals may reduce risk. Travel represents an important and probably underestimated risk factor for sporadic illness with S. Typhimurium. Improved national surveillance and detailed investigation of travel-related illness are required.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2004 Cambridge University Press

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 91 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 16th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Risk factors for Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 and non-DT104 infection: a Canadian multi-provincial case-control study
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Risk factors for Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 and non-DT104 infection: a Canadian multi-provincial case-control study
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Risk factors for Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 and non-DT104 infection: a Canadian multi-provincial case-control study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *