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The rise and decline in Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis outbreaks attributed to egg-containing foods in the United States, 1973–2009

  • A. P. WRIGHT (a1) (a2), L. RICHARDSON (a1), B. E. MAHON (a1), R. ROTHENBERG (a3) and D. J. COLE (a1)...

Summary

Salmonella enterica causes an estimated 1 million domestically acquired foodborne illnesses annually. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is among the top three serovars of reported cases of Salmonella. We examined trends in SE foodborne outbreaks from 1973 to 2009 using Joinpoint and Poisson regression. The annual number of SE outbreaks increased sharply in the 1970s and 1980s but declined significantly after 1990. Over the study period, SE outbreaks were most frequently attributed to foods containing eggs. The average rate of SE outbreaks attributed to egg-containing foods reported by states began to decline significantly after 1990, and the proportion of SE outbreaks attributed to egg-containing foods began declining after 1997. Our results suggest that interventions initiated in the 1990s to decrease SE contamination of shell eggs may have been integral to preventing SE outbreaks.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr A. P. Wright, 723 Cramer Avenue, Lexington, KY 40502, USA. (Email: ashtonpotterwright@gmail.com)

References

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