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Retrospective seroepidemiological study of chikungunya infection in South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific region

  • M. M. NGWE TUN (a1), S. INOUE (a1), K. Z. THANT (a2), N. TALEMAITOGA (a3), A. ARYATI (a4), E. M. DIMAANO (a5), R. R. MATIAS (a6), C. C. BUERANO (a1) (a6), F. F. NATIVIDAD (a6), W. ABEYEWICKREME (a7), N. T. T. THUY (a8), L. T. Q. MAI (a8), F. HASEBE (a1) (a8), D. HAYASAKA (a1) and K. MORITA (a1)...

Summary

Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Ross River virus (RRV) of the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae are mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and the symptoms they cause in patients are similar to dengue. A chikungunya (CHIK) outbreak re-emerged in several Asian countries during 2005–2006. This study aimed to clarify the prevalence of CHIKV infection in suspected dengue patients in six countries in South Asia and Southeast Asia. Seven hundred forty-eight serum samples were from dengue-suspected patients in South Asia and Southeast Asia, and 52 were from patients in Fiji. The samples were analysed by CHIKV IgM capture ELISA, CHIKV IgG indirect ELISA and focus reduction neutralization test against CHIKV or RRV. CHIK-confirmed cases in South Asia, particularly Myanmar and Sri Lanka, were 4·6%, and 6·1%, respectively; and in Southeast Asia, particularly Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam, were 27·4%, 26·8% and 25·0%, respectively. It suggests that CHIK was widely spread in these five countries in Asia. In Fiji, no CHIK cases were confirmed; however, RRV-confirmed cases represented 53·6% of suspected dengue cases. It suggests that RRV is being maintained or occasionally entering from neighbouring countries and should be considered when determining a causative agent for dengue-like illness in Fiji.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: K. Morita, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Virology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki City, 852-8523, Japan. (Email: moritak@nagasaki-u.ac.jp)

References

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