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Respiratory tract infections due to Branhamella catarrhalis: epidemiological data from Western Australia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2009

Cristina DiGiovanni
Affiliation:
School of Medical Technology, Western Australian Institute of Technology, Bentley 6102, Western Australia
Thomas V. Riley
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, Nedlands 6009, Western Australia
Gerard F. Hoyne
Affiliation:
Department of Microbiology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, Nedlands 6009, Western Australia
Rebecca Yeo
Affiliation:
School of Medical Technology, Western Australian Institute of Technology, Bentley 6102, Western Australia
Patricia Cooksey
Affiliation:
School of Medical Technology, Western Australian Institute of Technology, Bentley 6102, Western Australia
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During a 3-year period Branhamella catarrhalis was isolated in significant numbers from 239 (1·3%) of 19488 specimens of sputum sent for routine microbiological examination at a 700-bed general hospital. The majority of patients (83%) were over 60 years of age and 65% were male. There was a distinet seasonal variation in isolations with a peak incidence during the winter and early spring, a pattern not found with other pathogens. Susceptibility to amoxycillin decreased by approximately 50% over the 3 years, corresponding to an increased incidence of beta-lactamase-producing strains. There were minimal changes in susceptibility to other antimicrobial agents. Underlying pulmonary disease was the major factor predisposing to B. catarrhalis infection, and 71% of patients were smokers or ex-smokers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

References

REFERENCES

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