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Repeated re-use of sea water as a medium for the functioning and self-cleansing of molluscan shellfish

  • L. A. Allen (a1), G. Thomas (a1), M. C. C. Thomas (a1), A. B. Wheatland (a1), H. N. Thomas (a1), E. E. Jones (a1), J. Hudson (a1) and H. P. Sherwood (a2)...

Extract

When mussels are allowed to function in sea water the main changes occurring in the water are depletion of dissolved oxygen and lowering of pH value. Provided the faeces and pseudo-faeces are not disturbed the increase in the content of organic matter is not appreciable. If the supernatant water is removed and aerated with diffused air the water is re-oxygenated, the pH value is restored to its original level, and the water so treated may be re-used for immersing a fresh batch of mussels. The process of re-use may apparently be continued indefinitely.

Under these conditions a high degree of cleansing is achieved by the mussels, the count of coli-aerogenes bacteria being reduced to a small fraction of the original; counts of bacteria in the water, on the other hand, are subject to large fluctuations. It was considered advisable for this reason to chlorinate the water between each cycle of cleansing in order to immerse the mussels on each occasion in water which itself was reasonably certain to be free from coliform bacteria, potentially including pathogens.

Experience showed that the greatest difficulty involved in the use of chlorine was in removing residual chlorine so that it would not inhibit functioning of the mussels when the water was re-used. After trials of various alternatives it was concluded that the most satisfactory method was to determine by means of small-scale tests the smallest quantity of chlorine (below the break-point) required to give a residual concentration of 0·05–0·10 p.p.m. in the re-used water and then to add the corresponding quantity with precision to the bulk of water by means of a dosing apparatus while the water was being pumped from the mussel tank to the aeration tank. After a period of contact of 1 hr. the water was aerated for a further hour. A series of trials in a semll-scale plant showed that this treatment ensured that residual chlorine in the water being added to the mussels did not exceed 0·05 p.p.m.; as a result the mussels functioned satisfactorily and the degree of cleansing attained was comparable with that attained in the existing mussel-cleansing tanks in which sterilized fresh sea water is used for each cycle of cleansing. Although the concentration of residual chlorine was small the mussels kept the water so clear that this concentration was effectively bactericidal and the bacterial quality of the water was usually comparable with that of good drinking water. Low temperatures retard the metabolic activity of mussels and below 4° C. this is so marked that the degree of cleansing achieved is unsatisfactory. For this reason it is recommended that the temperature of the re-used water should be maintained at 6° C. (43° F.) or above.

Oysters were found to be satisfactorily cleansed by a process of re-use similar to that adopted for mussels, provided the temperature of the water was maintained at 54° F. (12·2° C.) or rather higher.

Small-scale trials showed that artificial sea water, prepared by dissolving in fresh water suitable quantities of the major constituents of natural sea water, could be successfully re-used for cleansing mussels.

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References

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Harvey, H. W. (1928). Biological Chemistry and Physics of Sea Water. Cambridge University Press.
Harvey, H. W. (1945). Recent Advances in the Chemistry and Biology of Sea Water. Cambridge University Press.
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Partington, J. R. (1949). Text Book of Inorganic Chemistry. London: Macmillan.
Webb, H. M. (1930). ‘Report on Oyster Purification Experiments.’ Unpublished report of Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Fisheries Experiment Station, Conway. Interim reports in Ann. Rep. for Sea Fisheries (1924–9, 1931), Min. Agric. Fish.
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Repeated re-use of sea water as a medium for the functioning and self-cleansing of molluscan shellfish

  • L. A. Allen (a1), G. Thomas (a1), M. C. C. Thomas (a1), A. B. Wheatland (a1), H. N. Thomas (a1), E. E. Jones (a1), J. Hudson (a1) and H. P. Sherwood (a2)...

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