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Recent trends in the epidemiology of non-typhoidal Salmonella in Israel, 1999–2009

  • R. BASSAL (a1) (a2), A. REISFELD (a3), N. ANDORN (a3), R. YISHAI (a3), I. NISSAN (a3), V. AGMON (a3), N. PELED (a4), C. BLOCK (a5), N. KELLER (a6), Y. KENES (a7), D. TARAN (a8), B. SCHEMBERG (a8), S. KEN-DROR (a9), T. ROUACH (a10), B. CITRON (a11), E. BERMAN (a12), M. S. GREEN (a13), T. SHOHAT (a1) (a2) and D. COHEN (a1) (a2)...

Summary

The aim of the present study was to assess the recent trends in the epidemiology of non-typhoid Salmonella in Israel using a sentinel laboratory-based surveillance network. Between 1999 and 2009, 8758 Salmonella stool isolates were reported by five sentinel laboratories. There was a significant decrease in the incidence rate of Salmonella isolates from 70·5/100 000 in 1999 to 21·6/100 000 in 2005 followed by a slight increase to 30·3/100 000 in 2009. Of all Salmonella, 64·3% were isolated from children in the 0–4 years age group. Up to 2008, S. Enteritidis was the most prevalent serotype and in 2009 S. Infantis emerged as the most common Salmonella serotype. The decrease in the incidence of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium and increase in S. Infantis among humans were associated with a similar trend among breeding flocks, which followed significant preventive interventions conducted against S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium infections in poultry. Tight surveillance and education of food handlers and consumers should be enhanced to reduce the foodborne transmission of Salmonella in Israel.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: D. Cohen, MPH, PhD, Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel. (Email: dancohen@post.tau.ac.il)

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