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Rate of tuberculosis infection in children and adolescents with household contact with adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis as assessed by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays

  • M. A. G. FERRARINI (a1), F. G. SPINA (a1), L. Y. WECKX (a1), H. M. LEDERMAN (a2) and M. I. De MORAES-PINTO (a1)...

Summary

Tuberculosis (TB) infection was evaluated in Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents exposed and unexposed (control group) to adults with active pulmonary TB. Both groups were analysed by clinical and radiological assessment, TST, QFT-IT and T-SPOT.TB. The three tests were repeated after 8 weeks in the TB-exposed group if results were initially negative. Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) were treated and tests were repeated after treatment. Fifty-nine TB-exposed and 42 controls were evaluated. Rate of infection was 69·5% and 9·5% for the exposed and control groups, respectively. The exposed group infection rate was 61% assessed by TST, 57·6% by T-SPOT.TB, and 59·3%, by QFT-IT. No active TB was diagnosed. Agreement between the three tests was 83·1% and 92·8% in the exposed and control groups, respectively. In the exposed group, T-SPOT.TB added four TB diagnoses [16%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·6–30·4] and QFT-IT added three TB diagnoses (12%, 95% CI 0–24·7) in 25 individuals with negative tuberculin skin test (TST). Risk factors associated to TB infection were contact with an adult with active TB [0–60 days: odds ratio (OR) 6·9; >60 days: OR 27·0] and sleeping in the same room as an adult with active TB (OR 5·2). In Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents, TST had a similar performance to interferon-gamma release assays and detected a high rate of LTBI.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: M. I. de Moraes Pinto, MD, PhD, Rua Pedro de Toledo, 781/9° andar, São Paulo, SP 04039-032, Brazil. (Email: m.isabelmp@uol.com.br)

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Rate of tuberculosis infection in children and adolescents with household contact with adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis as assessed by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays

  • M. A. G. FERRARINI (a1), F. G. SPINA (a1), L. Y. WECKX (a1), H. M. LEDERMAN (a2) and M. I. De MORAES-PINTO (a1)...

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