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Public health response to a measles outbreak on a university campus in Australia, 2015

  • J. Smith (a1), S. Banu (a1), M. Young (a1), D. Francis (a1), K. Langfeldt (a1) and K. Jarvinen (a2)...

Abstract

This report describes the effective public health response to a measles outbreak involving a university campus in Brisbane, Australia. Eleven cases in total were notified, mostly university students. The public health response included targeted measles vaccination clinics which were established on campus and focused on student groups most likely to have been exposed. The size of the university population, social interaction between students on and off campus, as well as limited vaccination records for the university community presented challenges for the control of this extremely infectious illness. We recommend domestic students ensure vaccinations are current prior to matriculation. Immunisation information should be included in university student enrolment packs. Incoming international students should ensure routine vaccinations are up-to-date prior to arrival in Australia, thereby reducing the risk of importation of measles and other infectious diseases.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: James Smith, E-mail: James.Smith2@health.qld.gov.au

References

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Keywords

Public health response to a measles outbreak on a university campus in Australia, 2015

  • J. Smith (a1), S. Banu (a1), M. Young (a1), D. Francis (a1), K. Langfeldt (a1) and K. Jarvinen (a2)...

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