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Psychological impact of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak in health workers in China

  • Dandan Sun (a1), Dongliang Yang (a2), Yafen Li (a1), Jie Zhou (a1), Wenqing Wang (a1), Quanliang Wang (a1), Nan Lin (a1), Ailin Cao (a1), Haichen Wang (a3) and Qingyun Zhang (a1)...

Abstract

The first case of 2019-nCoV pneumonia infection occurred in Wuhan, Hubei Province, South China Seafood Market in December 2019. As a group with a high probability of infection, health workers are faced with a certain degree of psychological challenges in the process of facing the epidemic. This study attempts to evaluate the impact of 2019-nCoV outbreak on the psychological state of Chinese health workers and to explore the influencing factors. During the period from 31 January 2020 to 4 February 2020, the ‘Questionnaire Star’ electronic questionnaire system was used to collect data. The 2019-nCoV impact questionnaire and The Impact of Event Scale (IES) were used to check the psychological status of health workers in China. A total of 442 valid data were collected in this study. Seventy-four (16.7%) male and 368 (83.3%) female individuals participated in this study. The average score of high arousal dimension was 5.15 (s.d. = 4.71), and the median score was 4.0 (IQR 2.0, 7.0). The average score of IES was 15.26 (s.d. = 11.23), and the median score was 13.5 (IQR 7.0, 21.0). Multiple regression analysis showed that there were critical statistical differences in high arousal scores among different gender groups (male 3.0 vs. female 5.0, P = 0.075). Whether being quarantined had significant statistical differences of IES scores (being quarantined 16.0 vs. not being quarantined 13.0, P = 0.021). The overall impact of the 2019-nCoV outbreak on health workers is at a mild level. Chinese health workers have good psychological coping ability in the face of public health emergencies.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Qingyun Zhang, E-mail: qingyun6677@126.com

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Keywords

Psychological impact of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak in health workers in China

  • Dandan Sun (a1), Dongliang Yang (a2), Yafen Li (a1), Jie Zhou (a1), Wenqing Wang (a1), Quanliang Wang (a1), Nan Lin (a1), Ailin Cao (a1), Haichen Wang (a3) and Qingyun Zhang (a1)...

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