Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

A Prospective study of genital infections in a family planning clinic: 2. Chlamydia infection - the identification of a high-risk group

  • M. E. Macaulay (a1), T. Riordan (a1), J. M. James (a2), P. A. Leventhall (a2), E. M. Morris (a2), B. R. Neal (a2) and D. A. Ellis (a3)...

Summary

During a study of genital infection in inner-city family-planning patients we examined 452 women for Chlamydia trachomatis. The prevalence of infection was 7·3%. There was no significant difference between patients attending because of genital symptoms and those who were attending for routine family-planning advice. Infection was found to be correlated with five main demographic parameters; age less than 25, no stable partnership, hormonal contraception, nulliparity and West Indian Ethnic origin. Using these parameters a simple scoring system was devised which allowed a high-risk population to be defined in whom screening would be economically justified.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      A Prospective study of genital infections in a family planning clinic: 2. Chlamydia infection - the identification of a high-risk group
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      A Prospective study of genital infections in a family planning clinic: 2. Chlamydia infection - the identification of a high-risk group
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      A Prospective study of genital infections in a family planning clinic: 2. Chlamydia infection - the identification of a high-risk group
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
1.Rahm, VA, Belsheim, J, Gleerup, A, Gnarpe, H, Rosen, G.Asymptomatic carriage of Chlamydia trachomatis - a study of 109 teenage girls. Eur J Sex Transm Dis 1986: 3: 91–4.
2.Schachter, J, Grossman, M, Sweet, RL, Holt, J, Jordan, C, Bishop, E.Prospective study of perinatal transmission of Chlamydia trachomatis. JAMA 1986; 255: 3374–87.
3.Public Health Laboratory Service Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre. Sexually transmitted disease in Britain: 19851986. Genitourin Med 1989; 65. 117–21.
4.Chlamydia trachomatis infections-policy guidelines for prevention and control. MMWR 1985; 34; ES: 53S74S.
5.Phillips, RS, Aronson, MD, Taylor, WC, Safran, C.Should tests for Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection be done during routine gynecological visits. Ann Int Med 1987; 107: 188–94.
6.Southgate, LJ, Treharne, JD, Forsey, T.Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections in women attending inner city general practices. Br Med J 1983; 287: 879–81.
7.Wood, PL, Hobson, D, Rees, E.Genital infections with Chlamydia trachomatis in women attending an antenatal clinic. Br J Obstet Gynec 1984; 91: 1171–6.
8.Riordan, T, Macaulay, ME, James, JM, Leventhall, PA, Morris, EM, Neal, BR, Rowland, J, Evans, BM.A prospective study of genital infections in a family planning clinic. I Microbiological findings and their association with vaginal symptoms. Epidemiol Infect 1990; 104: 4753.
9.Richmond, SJ.The isolations of chlamydia subgroup A (Chlamydia trachomatis) in irradiated McCoy cells. Med Lab Technol 1974; 31: 79.
10.Washington, AE, Johnson, RE, Sanders, LL.Chlamydia trachomatis infections in the United States. What are they costing us? JAMA 1987; 257: 2070–2.
11.Handsfield, HH, Jasman, LL, Roberts, PL, Hanson, VW, Kothenbeutal, RL, Stamm, WE.Criteria for selective screening for Chlamydia trachomatis infection in women attending family planning clinics. JAMA 1986; 255: 1730–4.
12.Louv, WC, Austin, H, Perlman, J, Alexander, WJ.Oral contraceptive use and the risk of chlamydia and gonococcal infections. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1989; 160: 396402.
13.Harrison, HR, Costin, M, Meder, JB, Bownds, LM, Sim, DA, Lewis, M, Alexander, ER.Cervical Chlamydia trachomatis infection in university women: relationship to history, contraception, ectopy, and cevicitis. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1985; 153: 244–51.
14.Gall, SA.Oral contraceptives and chlamydia infection. JAMA 1986; 255: 38.

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

A Prospective study of genital infections in a family planning clinic: 2. Chlamydia infection - the identification of a high-risk group

  • M. E. Macaulay (a1), T. Riordan (a1), J. M. James (a2), P. A. Leventhall (a2), E. M. Morris (a2), B. R. Neal (a2) and D. A. Ellis (a3)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.